#2985: Armadillo

ARMADILLO

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

With how many animal-themed foes Spider-Man’s got, plus the fact that this is a Spider-Man-themed assortment of Legends, it’s natural to assume that Armadillo is just a Spidey villain through and through.  He’s not.  He actually first appeared in Captain America, and would kind of remain revolving around Cap and the Avengers for a bit, before the animal-themed thing did eventually lead to him being grouped with Spidey’s foes.  He’s one of those lower-tier villains with a rather tragic and relatable backstory, who writers like to start down the path of redemption every few years or so.  I certainly can get behind that type of storytelling, since it’s kind at the core of the whole Marvel experience, really.  Armadillo is the latest of those sorts of characters to finally get the action figure treatment, and I’ll be taking a look at said treatment today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Armadillo is the titular Build-A-Figure for the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends.  His choice for the assortment is more than likely based on his cropping up in the MODOK show, though it also just may be because Hasbro was running through the list of larger characters without any toy coverage and settled on him.  Either way, I’m not gonna knock it.  The figure stands about 8 inches tall and he has 27 points of articulation.  Similar to Ursa Major earlier this year, Armadillo is a figure I was expecting some sort of re-use or something on, since he’s a rather minor character and all.  However, this guy is all-new, which is a pleasant surprise to say the least.  He’s based on a more modern interpretation of Armadillo.  I like him to be a little goofier myself, but I won’t deny that it’s a pretty decent sculpt, which does an alright job of capturing the general essence of the character.  I quite like the detailing on the armor plating; it’s got some great texture work.  Curiously, though he’s an all-new sculpt, the elbows and knees have visible pins…on one side.  The other side is without the visible pin.  It’s weird.  Armadillo’s paint work is generally rather basic looking.  His construction means that the underlying body and the armor are mostly separate pieces, so they can be molded in the proper colors.  What paint is there is very clean, and I definitely dig the subtle shift in the coloring on the main body.  It adds more to the look than you’d expect.  Armadillo’s got no accessories, but there’s not a ton you can really give him, and given his size and the uniqueness of the sculpt, coupled with him being an accessory himself, it’s not a big deal.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Armadillo is one of those characters that you don’t realize you want until someone goes and makes a figure, and then you’re suddenly aware of how lacking your life has been without him.  Or maybe that’s just me.  He served as my main reason for completing the set, and I gotta say, he’s a really fun, really chunky figure.  I really love these sorts of characters and I’m glad that Hasbro’s focusing on getting them to us.

This assortment is, overall, kind of a weak one for me.  Armadillo was definitely the main selling point, and in hand he’s definitely my favorite piece.  Shriek is probably the best of the singles for me, since we’ve just never gotten one before.  I do like Jonah a lot, though he’s not breaking any molds or anything.  Strange and the two Spidey variants are nice figures, but at this point some of the MCU upgrades are getting harder to get enthused about.  And while Miles and Morlun are both serviceable, both are figures that aren’t remaining in my collection beyond these reviews.  Given how fantastic the Spider-themed assortment that started the year off was, I guess this one just had too high a bar to clear.  I am happy with the figures I like, though, so it’s not like it’s a waist of my time or anything.

#2984: Shriek

SHRIEK

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Frances Louise Barrison, a.k.a. Shriek, escapes from captivity and forms a twisted family with like-minded villains to terrorize Spider-Man.”

In the ’90s, Venom was all the rage, so Marvel spun-off Carnage from him.  And then Carnage became all the rage, so, in 1993, Marvel used him as the central player in a Spider-book-wide crossover, “Maximum Carnage,” which teamed him up with his own band of super villains.  Mostly, they were repurposed from elsewhere, but brand-new to the crossover was Shriek.  Though certainly prominent within the story, Shriek has struggled to do much of note since then, so she’s not had much in the way of toy coverage.  She did get a Minimate three years ago, and now she’s also has a Marvel Legend.  Lucky her!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Shriek is figure 6 in the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends, where she is the second of the two comics-based figures.  Her spot in the line-up is no doubt due to the character’s presence in the Venom sequel, since it did elevate her profile at least a little bit.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and she has 29 points of articulation.  Shriek is built on one of the smaller female base bodies, but it’s been slightly tweaked to update some of the aesthetics, removing the visible pins on the knees, as well as updating the elbows to double joints.  The elbow construction is a little bit iffy, at least on mine. I wound up having to do a little bit of clean-up on the excess plastic at the edges, as it was causing the joints to get stuck and risk tearing.  After the clean-up, she was just fine, but it’s certainly something to keep an eye on when taking her out of the package.  In general, Shriek’s sculpt is a rather basic and straight forward one, but that’s something that Hasbro’s come to excel at, so she looks pretty good.  She’s quite clean and sleek looking.  A look like Shriek’s requires a very well-executed paint job, since it’s all just black and white.  Fortunately, she’s got some of the sharpest paint in the assortment, so her look winds up really sticking the landing.  Shriek is packed with a whopping three sets of hands, in fists, gripping, and open gesture poses, as well as the largest section of the Armadillo Build-A-Figure, the torso and backplate.  I suppose some effects might have been cool, but it’s hard to do sound as a visual thing, and I do really appreciate the extra hands.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I’m not the world’s biggest Shriek fan by any stretch of the imagination, but I won’t deny that the character has a pretty cool visual, so the fact that she’s been such a rarity in the toy world is kind of sad.  I wasn’t really rooting for her to get a spot here, but I also was definitely not opposed, and I do have to say that the final product turned out rather nicely.  She may be a rather by-the-numbers figure, but she follows those numbers well.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2982: Miles Morales

MILES MORALES

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“When a fierce power struggle threatens to destroy his new home, Miles Morales realizes that with great power there must also come great responsibility.”

In 2018, Sony took advantage of their exclusive distribution rights on Spider-Man media to release a totally PS4-exclusive game based on the character, which was rather a big hit. There were some toy tie-ins at the time, and last year they launched a follow-up game to go along with their launch of the PS5, now centering on Miles Morales in the title role. Unsurprisingly, there are some more toy tie-ins, starting with a standard version of the main character, who I’m taking a look at today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Miles Morales is figure 4 in the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends.  Miles is under the Gamerverse branding, and is the only such figure in this set.  He’s based on his standard costumed appearance from Spider-Man: Miles Morales, which is in turn a pretty straight translation of his costume design from the comics.  The figure stands just shy of 6 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  In terms of how the articulation works, he’s pretty much set-up the same way as the Integrated Suit Spidey, with the adjusted neck joint which includes the double ball joint.  It’s generally not a bad set-up, so I can get behind it.  Miles is sporting an all-new sculpt (which is shared with the Gamestop-exclusive stealth version).  It’s a little taller and the proportions are a little more nuanced than on the previous strictly comics Miles.  There’s also a good deal more texture work this time around, with raised webbing and some actual patterning on the suit proper.  It all looks pretty good, and helps give him a little bit of extra sharpness over his predecessor.  It also means that, unlike the Peter figure we got back in 2018, Miles is quite screen accurate, which is pretty cool.  Miles’s paint work is generally pretty solid.  The application’s all pretty sharp, and I quite dig the slightly metallic finish on the red sections.  Miles is packed with quite an impressive selection of accessories, getting three sets of standard hands (in fists, open gesture, and thwipping), plus a set of hands specifically for his shock abilities, as well as an unmasked head, and the right leg for the Armadillo Build-A-Figure.  Given how anemic the accessory selection on some of the Spidey variants has gotten more recently, as well as the fact that he’s an all-new sculpt, there definitely feels like a lot of value here.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Special thanks to Max for loaning this figure for review.  I’ve been taking a closer look at how I collect Legends in the last year, and with me already owning a pretty standard-looking Miles figure that I quite like, I wasn’t sure I was in a rush to get this one.  Max, not having the prior release, was snagging one, so he was kind enough to set me up with the BAF piece, as well as letting me borrow this one to round out the reviews.  This figure’s quite nice, I won’t lie.  He turned out very well, and I certainly appreciate the level of detail on the sculpt, as well as how well accessorized he is.  I also like that Hasbro’s committed to keeping a standard Miles available, especially one that’s just a strong all-around figure.

#2978: J Jonah Jameson

J JONAH JAMESON

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Behind the anchor desk on The Daily Bugle web site, Jameson does everything he can to sling mud at his greatest adversary — Spider-Man.”

One the very best things about the Raimi trilogy of Spider-Man films was JK Simmons as constant Spidey foil J. Jonah Jameson.  He was so perfect and irreplaceable in the role, that, in fact, they didn’t replace him.  The Garfield films left Jameson out entirely, as did Holland’s first outing.  However, at the end of Far From Home, we finally got to see the MCU version of Jameson, once again played by Simmons.  His role was really just a cameo that time around, so we had to wait until the follow-up film to see him get the proper action figure treatment.  It also means we got two Marvel Legends Jamesons in the space of one year, which is pretty crazy if you ask me.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

J. Jonah Jameson is figure 2 in the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends.  He’s the third of the four movie figures in the assortment, and also the second official Legends Jameson in the whole of the line.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 30 points of articulation.  Jameson is a mix of old and new parts.  Most of them date back to the Coulson body, which remains a tried and true standard.  To mix it up, he also gets the upper torso from Bruce Banner for a sans-tie look.  To further mix it up, he also gets what I believe is an all-new jacket piece (it’s buttoned at the front, which I don’t *think* we’ve seen before), as well as two all-new heads.  The heads are both based on the updated look for Jonah, with one being more neutral in expression, and the other shouting.  I personally prefer the shouting one, because that feels more inherently Jameson, but they both have a pretty strong Simmons likeness, and I do like having the options.  Jameson’s paint work is generally rather subdued, as is to be expected on a rather average looking person.  The paint on the heads is certainly nice (although the mustache on the calm head is a little sloppy on mine), and the rest of the work is good base work.  In addition to the two heads previously mentioned, Jameson also gets two sets of hands, one set flat, and one with a pointing/fist combo.  It’s very useful for the purposes of adding more expression to the character’s posing.  He also includes the right arm to the Armadillo Build-A-Figure.  I wouldn’t have minded getting maybe a Raimi trilogy style head for him as well, but ultimately what we got works pretty well.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Jameson is a simple, perhaps outwardly plain figure, as any J. Jonah Jameson figure tends to be, but I certainly had been hoping we might see him turn up since his appearance in FFH.  I wasn’t at all upset to see him crop up here.  The figure isn’t going to be wowing everyone or absolutely selling the whole assortment, but he’s very well done, and about as much as you could hope for from such a figure.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2977: Black & Gold Suit Spider-Man

BLACK & GOLD SUIT SPIDER-MAN

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Spider-Man relies on his Black and Gold suit and abilities to defend against threats.”

Everyone worth their salt knows that a Spider-Man movie these days can’t just have one look for Spidey.  How would you sell all these toys otherwise?  So far, all of the MCU Spidey films have had two main looks, and the merchandising has followed accordingly.  For No Way Home, I’ve already looked at the more classically “Spidey” Integrated Suit, but there’s also the slightly more divergent Black and Gold suit, notable for how black and gold it is.  The exact purposes of the suit are a bit muddied at the moment, but early listings referred to it as the “mystic” suit, so it stands to reason that it might be the suit more tied into Spidey’s dealings with Strange and his magic.  Whatever the case, it’s an excuse to put Spidey into all-black again, and everyone loves that.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Black & Gold Suit Spider-Man is officially figure 1 in the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends, since Integrated was not actually numbered and all.  He’s the second of the four movie figures, the second of the two Peter Parker Spider-Men, and the second of the three Spider-Men in the assortment.  The figure stands just under 6 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  Structurally, he’s pretty simple, because he’s actually just a total parts re-use of the Far From Home standard figure.  I’m not sure if that’s entirely accurate based on what I’ve seen of the suit so far, but it doesn’t seem like it’s terribly far off, and there are at the very least a good number of shared elements between the two suits.  Moreover, it’s just kind of a solid sculpt, so I don’t really mind seeing it crop up again.  There seem to be a few different options on the gauntlets, at least as far as we’ve seen from all of the other tie-in stuff.  This one goes for the look that keeps the Upgraded Suit’s red and black gloves, presumably to avoid the need for new parts.  In terms of paint work, this figure is admittedly a little bit messy.  Not terrible, but the belt in particular is definitely misaligned on my copy, which does not look super great.  Otherwise, he’s alright, I guess.  The figure is packed with the same sets of hands that the mold’s original release sported, as well as the left leg for the Armadillo Build-A-Figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Remember all of the things I said about not feeling the upgrades to the suits yesterday?  Well they apply even more so here.  I mean, it’s a different color scheme at least, and it’s also a mold I like, so in hand I don’t wind up minding this figure all that much.  Were it not for the issues with the paint, I’d say he was actually a rather nice figure.  As it stands, he’s just alright, but I don’t feel like he’s a space waster or anything, and I may feel more excited about him after seeing the movie.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2976: Integrated Suit Spider-Man

INTERGRATED SUIT SPIDER-MAN

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Spider-Man gears up in his Integrated Suit to bravely confront a new threat.”

Next week, we get the third installment in Tom Holland’s Spider-Man film series, Spider-Man: No Way Home.  It’s pretty hyped up, and there’s a lot going into it, and no one knows exactly how it’s going to play out, but it sure does look like a fun ride.  Hasbro’s actually managed to get the tie-in assortment out in a rather timely fashion, and I’ve managed to get them and prep them for review, also in a timely fashion, so how about that?  I’m going to be looking at the movie figures specifically this week, starting off with the newest Spidey variant, Integrated Suit Spider-Man!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Integrated Suit Spider-Man is part of the Armadillo Series of Marvel Legends.  He’s the first of the four movie-based figures in the assortment, as well as being the double-pack, and, of course, the one figure in the set that doesn’t actually come with a part for the Build-A-Figure.  The figure stands just shy of 6 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  The articulation scheme on this figure is largely the same as the prior MCU Spideys, with the only change-up being how the neck articulation works, as it’s now a proper double ball-joint, which gives him a slightly better range of motion.  Additionally, he’s the first movie Spidey with the pinless construction on the elbows and knees, which is pretty nifty.  The Integrates Suit is an all-new sculpt based on the movie design.  It looks like it’s kind of a mid-way point between the Iron Spider suit from Infinity War and his standard suit from Far From Home.  I’m still kind of partial to the FFH design myself, but this one looks pretty cool too.  The sculpt does a rather nice job of capturing the design as we’ve seen it in the trailers and promo shots, and translating it into a figure that’s consistent with the prior figures stylistically, while also improving a little bit on how the assembly works.  The sculpt’s definitely a bit sharper than the last couple of MCU Spidey’s, which is a nice trend, and he’s just generally got a very nicely put together, rather sleek appearance.  My only complaint is the the gauntlets are separate pieces, and, more specifically, that they’re not affixed, so they pop off when you go to swap out the hands.  It’s a minor issue, to be sure, but I almost lost one of them in the process of getting my photos, which was a little bit panic-inducing.  The paint work on this guy is a little bit better than the last one.  There’s a little more going on, and the application is pretty sharp.  They’ve still foregone the webline detailing, but I’ve learned to live with it.  Integrated Suit is packed with two sets of hands, in thwipping and fist poses.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

As noted above, I really liked the Upgraded Suit from FFH, so I wasn’t really sure about this new change-up.  I’ve liked what I’ve seen in the trailers, though, and I’ll admit it’s just generally growing on me.  The fact that the figure’s actually really nice certainly helps.  I appreciate that Hasbro took the opportunity to really refine the process here, and it results in a figure that’s just a really strong movie Spidey.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2975: Web-Man

WEB-MAN

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“A product of Dr. Doom’s Twin Machine, Web-Man is the opposite of Spider-Man in every way.”

And hey, we’re right back to the Marvel Legends.  Seriously, I hope you guys aren’t expecting a prolonged break from Legends soon, because I’m legitimately booked up through the new year with these suckers.  I blame Hasbro.  And also myself.  I did buy them all, after all.  Before I delve into the rest of this week’s very timely movie-themed Spider-Man figures, I’m going to first take a small detour into Spider-Man’s very first live-action adaptation, courtesy of The Electric Company.  The Electric Company had a live-action segment, “Spidey Super Stories,” which was itself the subject of its own adaptation in comic form back at Marvel.  Spidey Super Stories ran 57 issues, with all sorts of slightly more specifically kid-aimed stories.  In issue 25 of the series, Spidey faced off against Dr Doom and his Twin Machine, leading to the creation of Web-Man, Spidey’s opposite in every way.  Fortunately for our hero, this opposite set-up proved quite helpful in defeating Web-Man, since the opposite of Spidey being a genius made Web-Man a blithering idiot.  You know, for kids!  The most outrageous thing about all of this is that it all ends with Web-Man getting an honest to god action figure 44 years after that first appearance.  I certainly wouldn’t have put money on it.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Web-Man is a one-off Fan Channel release under the Retro Collection sub-line of Marvel Legends.  He started showing up at retail about a month or so ago.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 34 points of articulation.  Curiously, despite being in the Retro line, which had its own updated Spidey last year, Web-Man is yet another case of Spidey variant that *doesn’t* make use of the updated parts at all.  Instead, he’s using the ANAD 2099 and Spider-UK head combo that we saw on the first Gamerverse Spidey.  It’s certainly not a bad combo at all, and it matches up well with the mid-70s Spidey look, but it’s admittedly kind of funny that Web-Man, whose whole thing is being a copy, isn’t actually a copy of the standard Spidey from the same line.  In fact, he’s not a copy of any standard Spidey, since this exact combo of parts is still yet to be used for basic color scheme Spidey.  Speaking of color scheme, that’s this guy’s whole selling point, since he’s got a reverse color set-up.  It generally works pretty well, although, again, we’ve not actually gotten a Spidey with this specific shade of blue.  It matches the comics design, though, so I get why they went with it.  Web-Man is packed with three sets of hands, which I’m very happy about, because I get bummed out every time we get a Spidey variant without the full range.  Yay for the full range of hands.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Web-Man’s one of those rather goofy concepts that you never expect to see, at least not released in any explicit sense.  Like, maybe a one-off Spidey variant in some toyline might swap the colors for a laugh, but they’re not gonna actually call him Web-Man, right?  But, well, then they did, and now here we are.  He’s a very simple figure, with a very basic premise, but he actually does it quite well, and I’m honestly all about it.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2943: Zombie Hunter Spidey

ZOMBIE HUNTER SPIDEY

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Zombie Hunter Spidey is in a ragtag group of survivors, fighting his way through a zombie-infested world.”

In the original Marvel Zombies, just about all of the major heroes had been zombified, which included everyone’s favorite web-slinger, who in the main story actually served as sort of the token good guy of the zombie group.  For the purposes of the MCU version of the story, the zombies no longer retain their personalities, and Peter Parker is also spared his zombified fate, instead becoming the story’s central remaining human character.  It makes him a solid choice for toy treatment, I suppose, and so I’m looking at that figure today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Zombie Hunter Spidey is figure 3 in the Watcher Series of Marvel Legends, and the second figure in the assortment based on the “Zombies” episode.  The figure stands just under 6 inches tall and he has 30 points of articulation.  The articulation scheme on the figure is a little bit outmoded in its implementation, so he’s not quite as agile as you might hope.  Notably, as a first for an MCU Spidey, he lacks butterfly joints on the shoulders.  Not exactly sure why, but that’s how it is.  Peter’s design in the episode is a mix of a few of his designs from the movies, most heavily leaning on his Homecoming appearance, which is really the most classically “Spider-Man” look of the bunch.  To that end, his sculpt makes use of parts from the Homecoming figure (which does again raise the question of why the shoulder joints were adjusted.)  The figure’s upper torso and arms are new pieces, following the slightly tweaked design of the suit from the episode.  It’s really not terribly removed from the other MCU Spider-Men, which I suppose is the point, really.  During the course of the episode, Peter inherits Doctor Strange’s cloak of levitation, and as such the figure gets its own version of the piece.  It’s totally unique from the ones we’ve gotten with the various Strange figures, which was honestly surprising.  It also has no peg or anything to hold it in place, which does make it a bit hard to keep it seated properly.  Zombie Hunter Spidey’s paint work is notably brighter in color than other versions of the MCU suit, bit it works well.  There’s a bit of shading to indicate the suit’s gotten a little dirty during the apocalypse, which makes sense, and also keeps him from being too bland.  Spidey is packed with an alternate unmasked head, two sets of hands (fists and thwipping), and the right leg to the Watcher Build-A-Figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I had not particular attachment to this figure before the episode aired, and I still really didn’t have any after.  Mostly, I got him because I was getting the whole set.  He’s an MCU Spidey wearing a Doctor Stange cape.  That’s really it.  It’s not like he does that badly, I suppose, though the decision to remove the butterfly joints and not to include a peg on the cape both do seem rather strange, and also serve to kind of hold him back a bit.  Ultimately, he’s a rather middle of the road figure.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2914: Spider-Man – Negative Zone

SPIDER-MAN — NEGATIVE ZONE

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Spider-Man’s Negative Zone suit allows him to absorb the Negative Zone’s dark energy and even merge with shadows. By doing so, the wall crawler becomes practically invisible, which gives him a major advantage against his enemies.”

Last fall, Hasbro leaned pretty heavily into the retro carded style for Marvel Legends, specifically for their Spider-Man sub-section of the line.  There was a dedicated assortment of figures, as well as a handful of one-offs and exclusives.  Target got themselves two different variants on Spidey himself for their exclusives.  I looked at Cyborg Spider-Man last year, but I never got around to the other one, Negative Zone Spider-Man, who I’ll be taking a look at today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Negative Zone Spider-Man was released at the tail end of November of last year, alongside Gambit, Rogue, and Cyborg Spider-Man, as a small set of Target-exclusive Retro Collection offerings for Hasbro’s Marvel Legends line.  Like Cyborg Spider-Man, this is the Negative Zone suit’s third time in toy form, also following a Toy Biz 5 inch figure and a Minimate, just like Cyborg.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  The figure is a total repaint of Pizza Spidey.  It’s an interesting choice, really.  I don’t dislike Pizza Spidey in the slightest, and it was the standard Spidey for several years, but I find it funny that Hasbro tooled up a new standard Spidey for this very sub-line, and yet none of the variants on Spidey made use of the new parts.  Maybe they felt Negative Zone should be a skinnier Spider-Man?  Like I said, I don’t mind so much, but it is curious.  It’s all paint that makes the difference here.  He’s in a stark all black and white, as is accurate for the design, and it does look pretty sharp, I must say.  I just dig the sleekness, and the Pizza Spidey body emphasizes that.  Also something that excites me is the accessory selection, because for the first time in far too long, we get a Pizza Spidey release that actually gets the full range of hands.  How about that?  Boy how I missed the full range of hands.  He also gets the pizza, but in Negative Zone colors, which is pretty fun.  No half-masked head for eating the pizza, but I’ll learn to live with it, I suppose.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Neither of the Spidey variants from this round were essential to me, as I was far more focused on Gambit and Rogue at the time.  Target was running that “Buy 2 get 1 Free” sale at the time that they dropped them, and the only reason I really got Cyborg over this one was that this one wasn’t in stock at the moment I was ordering.  I saw him once or twice in-store, but I wasn’t in a rush.  I wound up getting him finally when one got traded into All Time.  I know, it’s quite a thrilling story, right?  Well, I guess more a touch thrilling than “I bought it at Target.”  I didn’t think much of the figure, but he’s actually pretty fun, and I’m glad I finally snagged one.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2764: Spider-Carnage & Spider-Woman I

SPIDER-CARNAGE & SPIDER-WOMAN I

MARVEL MINIMATES

As I discussed last week, the 10th series of Marvel Minimates would be the first of a number of re-use assortments, which were entirely built from previously existing parts.  This certainly had an impact on character choices as well, since they needed to be characters that would require no new parts in the first place.  The end result was something of a hodgepodge, but they did hold to a vague Spider-Man theme, I suppose?  Today, we’re looking at the totally sensible, and not at all strange pairing of Spider-Carnage and Spider-Woman!

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Spider-Carnage and Spider-Woman I were released in the 10th specialty assortment of Marvel Minimates, which hit in the summer of 2005.  This set was the non-variant set, with the  Spider-Woman II variant swapping out for this one in one pack out of every case, while Spider-Carnage remained.  They’re an odd pairing, since Spider-Woman wasn’t actually a Spider-Man character, and was in fact retired during Spider-Carnage’s brief run, but here we are.

SPIDER-CARNAGE

Spider-Carnage, being a combination of Ben Reilly and the Carnage symbiote, and even being in the same assortment as a Ben Reilly Spider-Man, honestly feels like he would have made more sense as the variant for this particular line up, but DST clearly felt differently.  He’s built on the post-C3 body (with a pre-C3 head, of course), so he’s about 2 1/4 inches tall and has 14 points of articulation.  Spider-Carnage’s construction makes use of the same bands as Ben Reilly, plus the hands from the Series 1 Carnage.  It’s a pretty straight-forward combo of the two, so I guess that makes sense.  Otherwise, he’s just handled with paint.  The application on the torso is 100% identical to the Ben Reilly, which makes sense from a consistency stand point.  He swaps out the blue for black, which isn’t strictly accurate, but Spider-Carnage was typically shaded a little darker, so I guess it’s not terrible.  He gets some additional red detailing on the arms and legs, which is true to the comics design.  The face is new, of course, but, rather strangely, the head loses the web-lines on the back that should be there.  Also, rather oddly, he drops the extra detailing on the wrist bands for a straight silver.  It’s an odd detail to drop, and feels like it would be more hassle than not, but I’m not in toy production, so what do I know?

SPIDER-WOMAN I

Jessica Drew had actually just returned to active duty in the comics, as part of the New Avengers line-up, early in 2005, making this figure a very well-timed and relevant choice, which was really a first for the line.  She too was built on the basic post-C3 body, but with the pre-peg-hole head.  As far as construction goes, do you remember Black Cat?  Because she’s exactly the same, as was her variant, the Julia Carpenter, and also Silver Sable, who was in this same assortment, too.  Not a ton of diversity there.  It’s not an inaccurate look for Jessica, so I guess it works.  Otherwise, she’s all paint.  Curiously, Jessica is entirely painted, from head to toe, with none of her parts being molded in the appropriate colors, a real rarity for Minimates.  It’s not terrible looking, though, and does help keep any weird bleed through from happening, so that’s good.  The one downside to the figure is that she’s got flesh tone painted on the top of her head, ruining an easy conversion to her fully cowled look from her earliest appearances.  It’s kind of an odd choice.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I snagged this set at the same time as last weeks pair, back when they were still new.  I actually don’t really know why, as neither of them really spoke to me.  I mean, I guess I like Jessica Drew well enough.  But it’s still not a set I really get excited about.  Ultimately, they’re both well put together figures, but neither of them really jumps out as all that inspired or anything.