#3120: Death Watch Mandalorian

DEATH WATCH MANDALORIAN

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“An extremist clan that attempted to take over Mandalore during the Clone Wars, the Death Watch Mandalorians are tenacious warriors embracing the ancient traditions of their people”

The first “mainstream” follow-up to Boba and Jango Fett in terms of depictions of the Mandalorians in Star Wars was in The Clone Wars, where the terrorist group the Death Watch appeared as antagonists of the Republic forces, attempting to take Mandalore back to its warrior roots.  The Watch took on a number of different forms over the course of the series, as they took over control of Mandalore, and eventually had their own splintering following Darth Maul’s machinations within the Watch.  Though the Watch are classically seen as antagonistic, The Mandalorian casts a slightly different light on them, placing them in the role of a young Din Djarin’s savior’s during the Clone Wars.  Well, at least one of them, anyway.  Since their appearance in the flashbacks in Season 1, the live action incarnation of the Death Watch has been slowly finding its way into toy form.  Today, I’m taking a look at the Black Series version.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

The Death Watch Mandalorian is figure 21 in the Mando-sub-set of Phase IV of The Black Series.  He’s both the final Mando themed figure in this assortment, as well as the final overall figure in the assortment.  He’s the fifth army builder to come out of The Mandalorian, as well as the third time we’ve gotten some form of Mando Warrior army builder in Black Series.  He’s based on the Mando that saves Din during his flashback in the Season 1 finale, but all of the other Mandos in that sequence appear to be wearing the same armor, so it works as any of them, really.  The figure stands about 6 inches tall and he has 28 points of articulation.  His articulation structure is about what you’d expect for an armored figure in the modern incarnation of the line.  He’s got quite of mobility, and can generally pose pretty nicely.  There’s a little bit of restriction at the shoulders and hips, but other than that, everything’s pretty great.  This figure is sporting an all-new sculpt.  At first glance, he appears to share the head/helmet with Boba, but this one’s actually a single solid piece, with no actual underlying head.  There’s a chin and such sculpted under there, but it’s not fully designed.  I suppose there’s no real need for it to be a separate piece if there’s no chance of ever taking it off.  The rest of the body sculpt is pretty nicely handled.  The armor plates are separate pieces mounted in place, which gives it a nice, properly assembled feel.  The paint work on the Death Watch Mando is a decent set-up.  He’s much cleaner than a lot of Mandos, but that’s accurate to what we see on-screen; guess they had more time for armor upkeep in those days.  It’s a cool color scheme, which is rather unique.  I very much dig all of the blues.  The figure is packed with a larger blaster rifle and a small blaster pistol, which are both pretty fun pieces, as well as a jet-pack, which appears to be an all-new one, different from the others we’ve seen.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I dug the Death Watch look during Clone Wars, and I definitely dug the updated version of the design that showed up in The Mandalorian.  Given it’s short appearance, I wasn’t expecting to see it show up particularly soon, but it’s also not something I thought was entirely unlikely.  I liked the Clone Wars version that came out in 2020, but it was built on an old mold, so I was glad to see the all-new version show up here.  He’s a really solid, really fun figure, showcasing all of the advancements that Hasbro’s worked into this line in the last few years.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3119: The Client

THE CLIENT

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“A mysterious Imperial who keeps a low profile in a safehouse on Nevarro, the Client is the face behind an otherwise faceless bounty, an off-the-record assignment with a high value”

Yesterday, I discussed one of the instances of The Mandalorian bringing back characters from elsewhere within the franchise, but how about all those new characters it introduced?  During the first season, we got quite a few new recurring characters.  Showing up in the first episode and remaining confined to the show’s first year was “The Client,” a mysterious, unnamed former Imperial played by Werner Herzog.  Though certainly not one of the show’s action-oriented characters, he nevertheless added a distinctive quality to all of his scenes, which helped to really sell the show as its own thing early in its run.  And, surprising everyone, now he’s an action figure.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

The Client is figure 20 in the Mandalorian sub-set of Black Series‘ Phase IV incarnation.  He’s the second of the three Mando figures in this particular assortment.  The figure stands just over 6 inches tall and he has 27 points of articulation.  His articulation scheme is more on the restricted side compared to the rest of the assortment, but it’s kind of sensible, given that he’s by far the least action-y of the bunch.  He’s still got more than enough mobility to pull any of the poses you’d really need from him…well, apart from sitting down, since the jacket doesn’t really allow for that.  The Client’s sculpt is all-new, based on his look in the show.  The real selling point, of course, is the Herzog likeness, which is pretty strong.  Not quite 100% there, but close enough to be recognizable in context.  The body replicates his outfit from the show pretty nicely.  There’s a lot of texturing, and a few separate pieces, which gives him a lot of rather nice depth to his design.  The Client’s paint work is generally pretty decent.  As with most of the Black Series, he’s on the drab side, but appropriately so.  The one thing I’m really not big on is the flesh tone paint on the bald spot, which is rather jarring compared to the molded skin tone on the rest of the head.  I’m sure there’s a production reason for the choice, but it just looks weird as is.  The Client is packed with a tracking fob, a camtono (aka the icecream maker), and two stacks of Beskar.  The camtono is actually a really cool piece, with a removable lid and opening panels on the sides.  Absolutely thrilled to have this prop in this scale.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

The Client is one of those figures that I didn’t really think I needed before he was announced, and even after his announcement I was kind of 50/50.  But, upon seeing him in person, and seeing the cool accessory selection, I decided to jump on him.  He’s not the most thrilling figure, I suppose, but he’s well done for a non-action-y sort of guy, and when else are we going to get a Werner Herzog action figure, right?

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3118: Ahsoka Tano

AHSOKA TANO

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“A Clone Wars veteran and now wandering Jedi, Ahsoka Tano forges her own path in the galaxy, righting injustices that she discovers”

Shifting the Black Series focus a bit for today, I’m moving from The Bad Batch forward in the timeline to the post-OT world of The Mandalorian.  While the first season was largely populated by characters original to the show, the second season saw a number of returning faces from elsewhere in the franchise.  Continuing her role as the connective tissue of the Star Wars TV shows is Ahsoka Tano, who serves as Din and Grogu’s first contact in the wider Jedi world.  She’s subsequently re-appeared in The Book of Boba Fett, and is slated for her own series next year.  She’s no stranger to toys, of course, but she’s just recently gotten a whole swath of live action-inspired figures, including a Black Series release, which I’m taking a look at today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Ahsoka Tano is figure 19 in the Mandalorian sub-set of Black Series‘ Phase IV incarnation, the first of the three Mando figures in the second assortment of 2022.  The figure stands 5 3/4 inches tall and she has 29 points of articulation.  Ahsoka’s articulation scheme is actually a pretty impressive set-up, all things considered.  The legs, specifically at the hips and knees, have been designed to allow for a very wide range of motion, while also still maintaining the cohesion of the sculpt.  It’s a careful balance, but one that works out very well here.  There are some restrictions in a few spots, of course, notably on the neck, due to the head tails, but given the overall nature of the design, it’s commendable that they got it working as well as they did.  Ahsoka’s sculpt is an all-new one, and it’s a strong one at that.  The likeness on the face is a solid recreation of Rosario Dawson in the role, and the body sculpt is realistically proportioned and has some really sharp texturing and detailing.  Ahsoka’s paint work is generally pretty basic for the line.  The printing on the face makes her suitably lifelike, and they’ve done a nice job with the markings on her face and head tails.  The body gets all the basics.  Nothing really crazy; just some blues and greys.  The application is cleanly handled for the most part, though there are a few spots on my figure where some of the masks were clearly a bit misaligned.  In particular, her right wrist bracer’s greys are off by just a bit, making the whole thing look oddly shaped.  Ahsoka is packed with her two lightsabers.  The blades are removable, and the hilts can be hung from her belt.  It’s definitely on the lighter side, but it’s also about what’s expected from this line.  I can’t really think of anything else she could really get, apart from maybe a soft goods cloak.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I enjoyed Ahsoka’s reappearance on The Mandalorian, and I really dug Rosario Dawson in the role, so, despite her only being minorly different from the other Black Series Ahsoka I have (on the outside, at least), I was still interested in seeing what Hasbro could do with the updated design.  She works really well.  I dig the new articulation set-up a lot, and I think this design works pretty well for the format.  Of the two Black Series Ahsokas I have, this one’s definitely my favorite.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3114: Boba Fett – Throne Room

BOBA FETT — THRONE ROOM

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“One of the most fearsome and capable bounty hunters in the galaxy, Boba Fett seemingly met his demise in the Sarlacc pit. A survivor, Fett lived to fight another day”

I last discussed Boba Fett just over a year ago.  I mean, on the site.  I’ve discussed him elsewhere more recently than that.  I mean, I think.  I don’t have a photographic memory of when I’m talking Boba Fett, or anything like that.  Hang on, I’m getting kind of lost in my own intro.  Let’s re-center.  Right, so when I was last discussing Boba Fett here on the site, I talked about how The Mandalorian had finally given the character something to do after thirty years of him just sort of sitting around.  Did this please his fans?  To be short: not really.  But it’s okay, he had his own show on the horizon!  That had to make them happy, right?  Cuz, you know, he gets to be a bad-ass, like the movies implied he was but never actually showed?  And, like, he gets, like character growth and stuff?  No, they don’t like that.  Too much focus on Boba Fett.  So, the show takes a breather from Boba, focuses on others.  That makes it better, right?  Still going with no, apparently.  Well, I guess we should all just pack it in at this point.  Hey, at least I got this new toy.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Boba Fett (Throne Room) is a Deluxe-sized Black Series offering, as part of Phase IV of the line.  He, like all of the deluxes, is a solo release, but he’s also meant to tie in with the handful of other Book of Boba Fett offerings, which started hitting in the last month or so.  There are a number of potential Fett variants spinning out of his reappearance on The Mandalorian and follow up in Book.  This particular figure is based on his “Throne Room” look, from the post-credits-scene of Mando Season 2, after he’s regained his armor and had it repainted, but before he goes through the bacta treatments in his own show.  The figure stands about 6 inches tall and he has 31 points of articulation.  Boba’s articulation scheme models itself on the improved style we saw with the last Deluxe Fett, although obviously slightly tweaked to be more practical with the new design.  Given that the new design is rather bulky, I was surprised by how much range some of the joints on this figure got, but I certainly won’t knock it.  We’re a far cry away from the Rogue One days, that’s for sure.  Boba is a mix of old and new pieces, as well as having a number of pieces that are designed for being shared.  The helmet and gauntlets are reused from the RotJ release from last year, while the head and parts of the legs are shared with the robed version of Boba from the main assortment that ties in with this guy’s release.  The rest is all-new, though, it’s worth noting that everything about this figure is getting at least one re-use, for the pre-repaint version of the armor from “The Tragedy.”  Whatever the source of the parts, they certainly work well.  Everything meshes well together, and it replicates his show design quite nicely, while also maintaining functionality as a figure.  The helmet may be the same as the Jedi version, but this time around it’s designed to be removable, and has even been modified to have an extra piece on the interior to make it sit a little better on this figure’s head.  The underlying head has a passable likeness of Morrison, albeit the heavily scarred version from The Mandalorian.  Honestly, the scarring helps to hide any weaknesses of the likeness a little bit, so it works in their favor a bit.  While I’d had issues with the prior helmet coming out of the package a little misshapen, this one was just fine right out the box, likely due to it not being packaged on his head.  Boba’s color work is fairly decent; it’s more basic, since it’s his much more cleaned up appearance, but it makes him far more bold and striking.  The work on the face is a bit more subtle, which is nice, and it adds to the overall lifelike quality of the figure.  Boba is packed with his jetpack (with removable rocket), a rifle, and a small blaster pistol.  It feels kind of light, given his deluxe status, but I guess that’s going more towards the overall depth of construction more than it is quantity of accessories.  Plus, there’s that whole business of Hasbro knowing with absolute certainty that people will always by Boba, even at a higher price point.  Can’t really fault them for playing the game, I suppose.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I really liked the last version of Fett.  It was a very fun release, and a great starting point for future versions of the character.  I also really enjoyed his updated appearance in The Mandalorian, and that was the main thing I wanted to see following the OT update.  This figure turned out really nicely.  He’s got a hefty price tag, but ultimately, he still feels worth it.  He’s just a lot of fun, and that’s what a good Boba Fett needs to be.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3107: Migs Mayfeld – Morak

MIGS MAYFELD — MORAK

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“A hot-headed ex-Imperial sharpshooter, Migs Mayfeld was once the leader of a gang of criminals. Mayfeld’s old ties help The Mandalorian on his mission to rescue Grogu from Moff Gideon”

We’ve been seeing some lulls as of late in some of Hasbro’s major lines.  Not all at the same time, of course; they’ve been kind of rotating a bit.  Hasbro’s still having some noted issues with proper distribution, and all that, resulting in some lines being few and far between on their releases.  I looked at one Black Series figure over a month ago, which was actually one that had been sitting in my “to review” pile for several months.  Before that, my last three Black Series reviews have all been reissues of one form or another.  How about something new for a change?  Well, newish.  Migs Mayfeld was first introduced in The Mandalorian‘s first season, as point man for the group performing the heist in “The Prisoner.”  He was portrayed by stand-up comic Bill Burr, noted for his (likely comedically exaggerated) dislike of the franchise, and was, at least in his first appearance, really just playing himself…IN SPACE.  The character returned during the show’s second season, in the episode “The Believer,” which gave the character a surprisingly effective emotional journey, and gave Burr a chance to deliver an incredibly nuanced performance, far outside of his usual range.  This second appearance rather resonated with viewers, making it the natural choice for the character’s first figure treatment, which I’m taking a look at today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Migs Mayfeld (Morak) is figure 15 in the Mandalorian sub-set of Black Series‘ Phase IV incarnation.  He’s one of three Mando-themed figures in this particular assortment…not that I’ve actually had the chance to see the whole assortment, or anything, of course.  Just Mayfeld.  Mayfeld is based on his disguised appearance from “The Believer,” after he and Mando steal Transport Driver armor to infiltrate the Imperial base on Morak.  It’s what he’s wearing during what’s really the character’s most definitive scene, and it also means that he can double as a Transport Driver, should you want such a thing.  The figure stands just shy of 6 inches tall and he has 27 points of articulation.  Since Mayfeld is disguised as an Imperial, it makes sense for the figure to re-use some Imperial tooling.  While the Transport Driver isn’t strictly speaking one we’ve gotten before, it’s show design was heavily built from the Mudtrooper design we saw in Solo.  Subsequently, a good portion of this figure is making use of the Mudtrooper Han parts.  It’s a solid sculpt, and not one that really got out there, so it’s a fairly sensible re-use.  Apart from the collar of the undershirt not being the same, and there being some lingering holes in the back meant for the hoses from the Mudtrooper mask, it’s a close enough sculpt to work.  He gets a new skirt piece, with his slightly tweaked belt and holster, as well as a new head and removable helmet.  The helmet is on in the package, so you can’t actually see the Burr sculpt at all until its opened.  You almost have to wonder is Burr requested that, since it’s out of the ordinary for how such figures are usually packaged.  The helmet is supposed to be the same one that the Tank Pilots were sporting, and it matches up pretty well, while still being removable.  Under the helmet is the proper Mayfeld sculpt.  It’s a pretty solid one, if perhaps a touch too large for the body.  The likeness to Burr is fairly strong, and it’s great that he’s got an expression that really breaks from the usual emotionless appearances we tend to see on these.  Mayfeld’s paint work is generally decent, with one notable thing that I hesitate to really call an “issue;” it’s more of a discrepancy.  The armor on his right arm is red, as it was on the Han figure, denoting a higher rank.  However, Mayfeld’s armor in the episode is without this extra coloring; it’s Mando who gets the extra detail on his armor.  So, this one gets extra paint that he shouldn’t technically have, which is the opposite direction that such issues tend to go with paint.  At this point, I wonder if Hasbro might intend to just give the inevitable disguised Mando the green arm, just so that you can swap them both for the proper set-up.  That said, VC made the same mistake on Mayfeld, and Mando was still sporting the red as well, so perhaps Mayfeld is just cursed to be given a promotion.  Worse things have happened.  Mayfeld is packed with the previously mentioned removable helmet, as well as a small blaster pistol, which is a pretty key accessory for him.  It’s kinda light, but it also covers the basics, so I’m not too bummed about it.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Mayfeld was a character that I had no issues with in his first appearance, but not one I was particularly intrigued by, or eager to see more of.  That said, his reappearance in “The Believer” was genuinely one of my favorite parts of the second season.  So, the announcement that he was getting a figure based specifically on that episode was cool by me.  Plus, it’s a Bill Burr figure, which is kinda cool in and of itself.  The figure turned out pretty well overall.  The issue with the coloring on the arm is honestly pretty forgivable, and I think he otherwise handles things well.  Now, the wait for the inevitable Mando to go with him begins.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3030: Koska Reeves

KOSKA REEVES

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“A master of hand-to-hand combat, Koska Reeves is loyal to Bo-Katan and is a member of a band of Clan Kryze Mandalorians striking back at the Imperial remnant.”

The Mandalorian‘s first season crafted a lot of new lore (or at least lore that was new to a wider audience) for the Mandalorians, leading some people to question how this would fit with the lore established in the likes of Clone Wars and Rebels.  The second season in turn brought that previous lore to the forefront, reintroducing Bo-Katan, and with her, a few other Mandalorians from her version of the culture.  Introduced alongside Bo-Katan’s live action debut were her two lieutenants, Axe Woves and Koska Reeves.  Koska seems to have been the one to take off a little bit more, since she re-appeared alongside Bo in the second season finale, and she’s also the first one to get a figure, which I’m taking a look at today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Koska Reeves is figure 12 in the Mandalorian sub-set of Hasbro’s Black Series in its Phase IV incarnation.  She’s the second of the two Mandalorian figures in this particular assortment, and is thus far the trickiest to acquire from this particular round, likely due to her being the short-pack for this set.  The figure stands just under 6 inches tall and she has 27 points of articulation.  Structurally, Koska is largely the same as Bo-Katan.  It’s not a surprise, nor is it unwarranted, since the two sport very similar designs.  Apart from some small details here and there, notably the collar of her jumpsuit, that aren’t quite spot-on, but it’s overall close enough to justify a little re-use.  The belt has been modified, downgrading her to one holster, rather than two.  It’s otherwise pretty much the same.  Koska’s helmet is an all-new piece, slightly different in its shaping than Bo’s.  It sits lower than Bo’s, which also guards the neckline a bit, covering up that one spot of inaccuracy.  Underneath the helmet is an all-new unmasked head sculpt, which is an okay offering, but doesn’t have quite the spot-on likeness for Sasha Banks you’d hope for, given the overall upward trend on Black Series likenesses recently.  Still, it’s a distinct sculpt, and gets a lot of the character down, even if the likeness isn’t quite there.  The paint work on Koska is okay.  It’s more in-line with the on-screen color scheme than Bo-Katan’s was, and it’s actually pretty bright and eye-catching.  Unlike a lot of this set, she actually gets a fair bit of accent work, especially on the armor.  Koska is packed with her jetpack and two blaster pistols, even though she’s only got a spot for one.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Since we’d already gotten Bo-Katan, it really was only a matter of time before we got some of her back-up.  Koska being the first makes a lot of sense, and I’m glad Hasbro didn’t opt to drag things out on this one.  She’s a pretty straight forward figure, banking on a lot of re-use, but it generally works out pretty well, and she fills out the roster pretty nicely.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3029: Q9-0 (Zero)

Q9-0 (ZERO)

STAR WARS: THE BLACK SERIES (HASBRO)

“A bug-eyed protocol droid with modified programming, Q9-0 — or “Zero” to his colleagues — operates with precision timing.”

The Mandalorian‘s first season had a minor running gag of pairing off Din, who was seen by some as just a stand-in for Boba Fett, off with other characters that were in some way stand-ins for the other bounty hunters from the scene aboard the Executor in Empire.  The most straight forward was, of course, IG-11 (who was even meant to just be IG-88 at an early stage of production), but Din also faces down some Trandoshans (the same species as Bossk) in the second episode, and in Chapter 6, one of his companions on the prison heist mission is Q9-0, a bug-eyed protocol droid turned bounty hunter, with some not unlike 4-LOM qualities.  And he’s also voiced by Richard Ayoade, which is a pretty cool thing in and of itself.  Now he’s got a figure, which is admittedly, not voiced by Richard Ayoade in reality, but is voiced by him in my mind.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Q9-0, aka Zero, is the 11th figure in the Mandalorian sub-line of Hasbro’s Black Series‘s Phase IV incarnation.  He’s the first of two Mandalorian figures in the assortment that hit retail last fall, and also the first figure to be based specifically on Chapter 6 of the show.  The figure stands about 6 inches tall and he has 30 points of articulation.  The movement on his arms is notably a bit restricted, largely due to design, but the legs get a much better range.  Whatever the case, he’s totally capable of getting all the appropriate movement for the character based on the show, as well as a little more movement in the legs, so he does what he needs to.  Zero’s sculpt is an all-new offering, not borrowing from any previous protocol droid sculpts.  It’s a good recreation of Zero’s on-screen design.  There’s quite a lot of detail work going into it, and the articulation is pretty well worked-in aesthetically.  He’s got a separate, albeit nonremovable, shoulder harness with some pouches, as seen in the episode.  It adds a nice touch of character to him, as well as giving him something that looks more worn-in compared to his more machined body, which makes for a cool contrast.  Zero’s paint work errs a bit more on the basic side.  All the standard color work is there, and he gets a little bit of accenting in a few spots, but generally, it’s just the basic.  It does rob the sculpt of some of its punch, just a bit, but because the sculpt is a s strong as it is, the lack of paint doesn’t really ruin the figure, either.  Zero is packed with a single blaster rifle.  He has a little bit of trouble getting it into his hands properly, but it’s otherwise pretty cool.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Zero was certainly my favorite part of Chapter 6 (I’m a sucker for cool droids), so I was hoping we’d wind up getting him figure form at some point.  I was fairly happy to see him turn up here.  The figure is pretty middle of the road all things considered, but that means he’s still far from a bad offering, and he’s probably my second favorite in this particular assortment.  I’m curious if we’ll see the rest of the crew from this episode, especially in light of Mayfield being based on his Season 2 appearance, but I’m honestly content to just have this guy, really.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3026: IG-11

IG-11

STAR WARS: THE VINTAGE COLLECTION (HASBRO)

Alright, after quite a length of nothing but Marvel Legends reviews, I finally got a week last week of some more random goodness, and now I’m feeling a little more refreshed for some more theme-week-ing.  Not quite Marvel yet, because oh boy do I need to build back up to that one, but how about another toy powerhouse that I haven’t looked at since the beginning of the year, Star Wars!  I’ve got a whole stack of Black Series figures to look at, but before I get to those, I’m going to take today to be slightly different, with a rare Vintage Collection review.  It’s an IG-11, so not *that* different, but still different.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

IG-11 is figure VC206 in the Star Wars: The Vintage Collection line-up.  He hit hit retail last fall, in an assortment that was otherwise Original Trilogy-centered.  I suppose he’s not entirely out of place there, but he’s still the only Mandalorian-based figure in the set.  The figure stands 4 3/4 inches tall and he has 27 points of articulation.  Amusingly enough, he’s actually quite a bit more posable than his 6-inch counterpart, by virtue of this one actually being an all-new sculpt, as opposed to just re-using a prior IG mold.  This means he gets properly jointed hips, as well as the a fully jointed head with all of the proper moving parts, which you don’t tend to see.  He’s also much larger in scale relative to the standard-sized figures he’s meant to go with, of course, but that’s really just about him having actual proper scaling, instead of the usual “just noticeably taller than the other figures” scaling that IG molds tend to get.  In general, his sculpt is quite an impressive one, and it works well around the articulation, which means it avoids my usual issue with TVC figures.  Most notably, on the sculpt front, he’s got the correct modified hands for IG-11, which have thus far only been correct on the Mission Fleet release.  That one’s still first in my heart and all, but it’s nice to have a correct set of hands on a more correctly styled figure.  IG’s paint work is generally pretty decent.  The base work covers all the slight variations in the finish of the metal that he’s made up of, and there’s a little bit of wear and tear that’s handled with some slight accent work.  It’s pretty nice in a general sense, and seems just about as good as the larger scale figure.  IG-11 is packed with the usual pairing of large and small blasters, which he holds pretty well.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

As I mentioned in my K2 review, I’ve more or less given up on collecting TVC, but I do have my exceptions to that.  K2 was one, and IG-11 is another. I was actually looking forward to this one quite a bit, and I was pretty excited to mess with him.  He turned out really nicely, especially for this line.  It’s not really enough for me to jump into the line any further, but I sure would love to see Hasbro do an updated Black Series version that’s a bit closer to this one in quality.

Thanks to my sponsors at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure for review.  If you’re looking for toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3007: Bo-Katan Kryze with Gauntlet Starfighter

BO-KATAN KRYZE with GAUNTLET STARFIGHTER

STAR WARS: MISSION FLEET (HASBRO)

Remember Mission Fleet?  You know, that all-ages-aimed Star Wars toy line that I’ve been following and actually really enjoy thoroughly every time I get around to reviewing one?  The one that I have, despite this, only reviewed twice on this site?  Yeah, that’s the one.  I keep bringing up the need to go back and get some of the backlog of them reviewed, but I keep, you know, not doing it.  Instead, I keep holding off for a new addition, which is what I’m doing now.  Again.  For the third time.  It happens.  Thus far, the two items I’ve reviewed have both been Mandalorian-themed, and this third review follows that same trend.  So, let’s have a look at Bo-Katan Kryze (who, much like sand, is coarse and gets everywhere) and her Gauntlet Starfighter!

THE TOYS THEMSELVES

Bo-Katan and the Gauntlet Starfighter make up the “Starfighter Siege” set of Star Wars: Mission Fleet, a Stellar Class release (the next size up from the two Expedition Class sets I’ve already looked at) from the tail end of 2021, which hit alongside Moff Gideon’s TIE Fighter and Obi-Wan’s Jedi Starfighter.  Though officially billed Mandalorian on the packaging, this set can work just as well as a Clone Wars release too, giving it a little more range, which is pretty cool, even if it is Bo-Katan.

The core Bo-Katan figure is in her full-armored attire.  The extra detailing on the helmet signifies her as at the very least a post-late Clone Wars version of the character.  The figure stands 2 1/2 inches tall and she has 9 points of articulation.  The articulation scheme here is the same as on the Mando, which is to say that it works generally pretty well given the scale.  Her sculpt is certainly more stylized than larger offerings, with slightly tweaked proportions on the head, hands, and feet.  It’s more cartoony, but not too overly so.  There’s still plenty of small detail work, and it tracks well with her design in both animation and in live action.  Bo-Katan’s paint work actually has quite a bit going on.  All of the important armor details are there, and she’s even got all the proper detailing on the helmet, which does look pretty cool.  Bo-Katan is packed with her jetpack (which is distinct from Mando’s), twin blasters, and her energy shield.

The vehicle portion of this set is far more prominent, given the higher price-point of the set.  Rather than just a speeder bike like the other two sets, there’s a full-fledged Gauntlet Starfighter include here.  It’s the ship she’s most frequently seen using, and it’s a fairly distinctive design, so it’s a strong choice.  The ship measures just shy of 9 inches tall and it’s 8 1/2 inches wide.  It’s just a one-person seater, but it’s still got a decent size to it, and it’s even got the full worked-in movement for the wings, as seen on-screen.  It’s a cool feature of a cool design, so it’s great that they worked it in there properly.  Given the ship’s larger scale, the added ports for compatibility with the rest of the line aren’t quite as obtrusive here as on the smaller vehicles, which is also pretty cool.  The color work on this one is also a bit more involved than the speeder bikes, making it a more vibrant and eye-catching design.  As with other vehicles, this one gets a large missile launcher and missile.  It can be mounted to any of the ports on the ship, and also includes its own articulated tripod piece for stand-alone use.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Cheyenne requested fairly early into Mission Fleet‘s run that I not buy all of them for myself, so I’ve been pretty deliberately holding on most of the line, just to give her a good stock of choices for gift ideas.  So, this was the one she opted to go for this year, which is honestly a pretty good call.  This is one of the cooler ship designs, and one that’s kind of rare in toy form.  It’s a lot of fun, and while Bo-Katan might be a coarse character, she does at least still have a cool design, making for a generally fun toy set-up.

#2815: Greef Karga

GREEF KARGA

STAR WARS RETRO COLLECTION (HASBRO)

NOTE: This review was written before June 6th.

“An expeditor for the Bounty Hunters Guild, Greef Karga runs the trade on Nevarro. He’s a middle-man, a connector between clients and bounty hunters.”

Same as it ever was, same as it ever was.  Same as it ever was, same as it ever was.  Letting the days go by, same as it ever was.  Why the Talking Heads opener?  Didn’t I do that yesterday?  Yes.  But it’s the same as it ever was, you see?  Aren’t I clever?  But really, sometimes with Hasbro’s variety of scales and styles, I do feel a little bit like I’m just reviewing in circles, and that’s very true with the back half of this set.  Not that it’s a bad thing, mind you.  Anyway, let’s look at the wheel of a large automobile Greef Karga!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Greef Karga is the final figure in the seven-figure Mando-inspired assortment of Hasbro’s Star Wars Retro Collection.  While Greef getting a figure isn’t weird at all, given how prominent he was in the first season, especially it’s closer, the fact that he’s actually the only explicitly Season 2 figure in the mix is a little interesting.  I guess it does at least change things up a bit from the Black Series figure I already reviewed, but then it also means he’s in the same attire as the also small-scale Vintage Collection figure.  And, on top of that, he’s very limited when it comes to who he fits in with.  But, of course, that’s part of the vintage game, now isn’t it?  The figure stands about 3 3/4 inches tall and he has 5 points of articulation.  Greef’s sculpt is a decent match for the Kenner style.  Again, he doesn’t look much like Carl Weathers, but there’s enough of the character in there to make it work, at least as much as any of the others work.  The right leg has a sculpted holster, but, rather cleverly, it’s designed to actually work, in a sense.  It’s not a modern style design, but actually something that feels more in line with what Kenner might have done.  I like that.  Like Mando and Gideon, Greef’s sporting a vinyl robe.  And while it’s still not technically accurate, it winds up in effect being more accurate to the character than going for a time-period accurate cloth cape might be, since it means he’s got the actual robe he wore, rather than just a straight cape.  So, this one I don’t mind so much either.  Okay, I honestly don’t mid any of them.  The paint work here is about on par with the others.  It’s obviously an adaptation of the design’s proper coloring through the vintage lens.  I get a kick out of the parts of it that are purposefully not painted, since it seems so counter to modern sensibilities, but also so perfect for the style.  Greef is packed with his small blaster.  It makes him a little lighter than everyone bar Kuiil, but he can hold it well, and it’s got that cool holster set-up, so that distracts me.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Like Gideon, I don’t know that I felt an undying need for this figure, but I think that may again be linked to getting the Black Series release a bit closer, and also maybe preferring the season 1 design a little bit.  I think of the whole set, Greef is ultimately the one that does the least for me.  Not that he’s bad or anything.  Honestly, he does what he needs to.  He’s just a little more middling than the others.  But, he’s still certainly a nice addition to the line.  In general, I liked this set quite a bit, even more than I’d been expecting to.  And I’d been expecting to like it a lot already.  I would love to see them delve more into the Season 2 characters, and maybe even a few more Season 1 characters.  I’d also love to see them go back to some of the other properties, like the sequel trilogy, and do more with the retro style, because it really works.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website and their eBay storefront.