#2975: Web-Man

WEB-MAN

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“A product of Dr. Doom’s Twin Machine, Web-Man is the opposite of Spider-Man in every way.”

And hey, we’re right back to the Marvel Legends.  Seriously, I hope you guys aren’t expecting a prolonged break from Legends soon, because I’m legitimately booked up through the new year with these suckers.  I blame Hasbro.  And also myself.  I did buy them all, after all.  Before I delve into the rest of this week’s very timely movie-themed Spider-Man figures, I’m going to first take a small detour into Spider-Man’s very first live-action adaptation, courtesy of The Electric Company.  The Electric Company had a live-action segment, “Spidey Super Stories,” which was itself the subject of its own adaptation in comic form back at Marvel.  Spidey Super Stories ran 57 issues, with all sorts of slightly more specifically kid-aimed stories.  In issue 25 of the series, Spidey faced off against Dr Doom and his Twin Machine, leading to the creation of Web-Man, Spidey’s opposite in every way.  Fortunately for our hero, this opposite set-up proved quite helpful in defeating Web-Man, since the opposite of Spidey being a genius made Web-Man a blithering idiot.  You know, for kids!  The most outrageous thing about all of this is that it all ends with Web-Man getting an honest to god action figure 44 years after that first appearance.  I certainly wouldn’t have put money on it.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Web-Man is a one-off Fan Channel release under the Retro Collection sub-line of Marvel Legends.  He started showing up at retail about a month or so ago.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 34 points of articulation.  Curiously, despite being in the Retro line, which had its own updated Spidey last year, Web-Man is yet another case of Spidey variant that *doesn’t* make use of the updated parts at all.  Instead, he’s using the ANAD 2099 and Spider-UK head combo that we saw on the first Gamerverse Spidey.  It’s certainly not a bad combo at all, and it matches up well with the mid-70s Spidey look, but it’s admittedly kind of funny that Web-Man, whose whole thing is being a copy, isn’t actually a copy of the standard Spidey from the same line.  In fact, he’s not a copy of any standard Spidey, since this exact combo of parts is still yet to be used for basic color scheme Spidey.  Speaking of color scheme, that’s this guy’s whole selling point, since he’s got a reverse color set-up.  It generally works pretty well, although, again, we’ve not actually gotten a Spidey with this specific shade of blue.  It matches the comics design, though, so I get why they went with it.  Web-Man is packed with three sets of hands, which I’m very happy about, because I get bummed out every time we get a Spidey variant without the full range.  Yay for the full range of hands.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Web-Man’s one of those rather goofy concepts that you never expect to see, at least not released in any explicit sense.  Like, maybe a one-off Spidey variant in some toyline might swap the colors for a laugh, but they’re not gonna actually call him Web-Man, right?  But, well, then they did, and now here we are.  He’s a very simple figure, with a very basic premise, but he actually does it quite well, and I’m honestly all about it.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2972: Hercules

HERCULES

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“The hero of Olympus, Hercules uses his mythic strength to prove he is worthy of immortality.”

Hey, let’s just move from one Marvel-ized interpretation of mythology to another.  We started with Norse mythology, and now we’re moving over to Greek mythology…sort of.  There’s a bit of Roman in there too, since Marvel calls him Hercules, when his proper Greek name is actually Herakles.  All of the other gods keep their proper Greek names, though.  Marvel are hardly the only people to do this, of course, but I do like giving them a hard time about it whenever it comes up.  Anyway, after going 12 whole years between Marvel Legends releases, Herc’s having a good decade, I guess, and getting another one just two years removed from the last one.  How about that?

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Hercules is the latest release in Hasbro’s Retro Collection sub-line of Marvel Legends.  He, like the last handful of them, is a Fan Channel-exclusive solo release, and just started hitting in the September/October area.  Hercules has had a few different looks over the years, all sort of revolving around the same basic design elements.  The two prior Legends releases each went with a distinct look, and this one continues that trend, with yet another look (although technically one that was already done in Marvel Universe).  This Herc is based on his shoulder-harness-sporting look from the ’80s, which he notably sported during his tenure with the Avengers under Roger Stern, amongst other things.  It’s a good look, and, like I said, one we haven’t gotten at this scale before.  The figure stands 7 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  Structurally, Herc shares a lot of his parts with the last Hasbro version, with the entire upper torso being shared between the two of them.  It was a really strong sculpt the first time around, and I’m a fan of anything that removes us further from re-using the Hyperion body again.  He gets a new set of legs, as well as new add-ons for his harness, belt, and wrist bands.  Additionally, he also gets not one, but two new heads, both of which are more closely patterned on his ’80s design.  The two heads are fairly similar, with the difference between them being expression.  There’s a more serious one, and one with a goofy grin.  I’m personally more a fan of the goofy grin, but both of them work very nicely for the character.  The new legs notably use the pinless construction for the knees, which is certainly a plus given the whole lack of actual pants and all.  Herc’s paint work is generally pretty decent.  The hair from the last figure’s chest has now spread to the arms, which I guess works pretty well.  The application on the change-over from the headgear to the hair is a little sloppy on both heads, but overall things are decently handled.  No major slop or anything.  In addition to having the two heads, Herc also gets two sets of hands (gripping and fists, like the last release), as well as his rather distinctive mace.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I really, really liked the last Herc Hasbro put out, but he was an admittedly very modernized take on the character.  Something a little more classic’s never really a bad thing for him, so I was actually pretty happy that Hasbro circled back around to him relatively quickly.  Even more so that he’s actually another distinct look for the scale, which allows all three versions to maintain their validity.  I think this one’s honestly my favorite of the three we’ve gotten so far, which is no small feat.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2971: Thor

THOR

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Armed with Stormbreaker and Mjolnir, the son of Odin steps onto the battlefield to face Thanos one final time.”

Happy Thor’s Day, everyone!  Man, it’s been too long since I’ve gotten to use that one.  I blame my own poor forward planning when it comes to review schedules.  But I totally remembered this time, so a-ha!  Though Avengers Endgame got a lot of coverage in Marvel Legends, the nature of a good chunk of the designs either being downplayed for the Quantum Suits, or kept completely secret until the film’s release, like Thor here, meant that there were still a number of designs still left out in the cold.  Thor effectively has three main looks during the film.  His pre time-skip look, which we got with the Infinity War stuff, his post-time-skip “the Dude” look, which we got as a Build-A-Figure in 2019, and his final battle attire, which we’ve just gotten now!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Thor is the last single-release standard figure for the Infinity Saga sub-line of Hasbro’s Marvel Legends.  He’s one of three items in the sub-line based on Endgame, which is the movie with the heaviest coverage here.  The figure stands about 6 3/4 inches tall and he has 29 points of articulation.  After years of the MCU Thor’s being almost comedically larger than the rest of the figures, it seems they’ve begun to slightly down-size him, ever so slightly, for more proper scaling.  So, this Thor is actually a little smaller than prior versions, but that’s actually more accurate to Hemsworth’s relative height to everyone else.  In terms of articulation scheme, this figure more or less sticks to what the Infinity War versions of him had, albeit slightly more restricted by his added bulk.  He does get the pinless construction on his elbow and knee joints, however, which is pretty cool.  Thor’s sculpt is all-new; the arms look similar to the IW ones, but, as noted previously, they don’t have exposed pins on the elbows, so they’re new too.  It’s a pretty solid sculpt overall.  Since it’s being released two years after the film, it doesn’t have to worry about odd preliminary design details that got changed, meaning it matches up pretty well with the design seen in the finished movie.  The head sports a respectable likeness of Chris Hemsworth, which, much like the Bro Thor, I think is aided a bit by the more distinctive features of the more disheveled appearance.  I quite like the detailing on the braided beard, and they’ve done alright with capturing the more scraggly-looking hair.  The body gets the slightly heftier build down pretty good, and the texturing and small detail work on the outfit’s all rather nice.  The paint work on Thor is generally pretty basic.  Most of the outfit and such is just molded colors, with more of the intricate work on the head.  The head ends up doing the same thing that the three-pack Infinity War version did, going for a more “powered up” appearance.  While I’m not opposed to the general concept, or even how it turned out on the figure, it’s a little bit limiting of a choice for the only included head.  Maybe at least throw us an extra head with standard eyes?  Like I said, it does at least still look pretty cool, so I can’t entirely fault it.  Thor is packed with both of his hammers, done up in clear blue to somewhat match his powered-up look, as well as two sets of hands (gripping and open gesture), and two lightning effect pieces.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I was honestly a bit surprised when we got the full-on Bro Thor before this one back when the Endgame product was first hitting, and even more surprised by the complete and utter lack of this figure in any of the immediate follow-up.  I was at the very least expecting some sort of multi-pack with the big three in their final battle attire or something.  Honestly, I wasn’t expecting a single release on him, but I can’t say I was disappointed by the choice.  Thor’s a pretty solid figure.  He’s a bit late to the party, perhaps, but that means we only have to contend with just the one of him from the start.  It’s certainly nice to get another final battle figure.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2970: Happy Hogan & Iron Man Mark XXI

HAPPY HOGAN & IRON MAN MARK XXI

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

Moving along the Iron Man timeline with our reviews here, we make our way to the final entry in that set of films, Iron Man 3.  IM3 had the good grace of being the first MCU film to get the Legends treatment proper, which was a pretty big deal at the time.  That said, it was just two movie-related figures in an otherwise comics assortment, which meant we just got the rather barebones Mark 42 and Iron Patriot releases, with scrapped releases for War Machine Mk II and Ben Kingsley’s Mandarin.  Later Legends treatments got those additional two released, and there’s been a slow trickle of a few additional House Party armors every so often.  We get one tribute to the film in the Infinity Saga set, featuring Stark Industries Head of Security Happy Hogan, as well as one more House Party armor.

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Happy Hogan and Iron Man Mark XXI are a Target-exclusive two-pack, released in the Infinity Saga sub-line of Marvel Legends.  They started hitting retail at the beginning of October, and have thus far been hitting in at least okay numbers.

HAPPY HOGAN

Stark Industries’ new Head of Security gets caught in the middle of the battle as Iron Man gears up to face an all new powerful threat.”

After six film appearances (with a seventh in later this month), Jon Favreau’s Happy Hogan finally gets some Legends coverage.  Not bad for a guy in a suit, I guess.  The figure stands just shy of 6 1/2 inches tall and he has 30 points of articulation.  Happy is a much larger guy than any of the other suit-wearers we’ve gotten, so he requires mostly new pieces.  He borrows the arms from the Logan version of, well, Logan, but is otherwise sporting all-new parts.  I certainly appreciate getting more variety to how the guys in suits are built; things were beginning to get a bit samey.  I do appreciate that he’s even got a pocket on his shirt under the jacket, showcasing that he’s just a little bit more working class than most of the other suit wearing guys we’ve gotten.  The only downside to the sculpt is that they’ve neglected to give Happy his ID badge, which is definitely gonna set him off.  C’mon guys, everyone needs to be wearing their ID badges.  By far the best part of the sculpt is the head, which has a pretty spot-on likeness of Favreau circa IM3, which is when Happy really comes into his own, so it’s a good choice.  He’s got a good recreation of Happy’s usual “sunny disposition.”   Happy’s paint work is reserved, but works well.  Mostly it’s just the face, which is quite lifelike.  Theres a few other spots on the suit, namely the belt and buckle.  It’s all pretty clean, and it does the job well.  Though he may not have his ID badge, Happy does at least get his cellphone.  It’s a tiny little piece guaranteed to be lost, but hey, it’s still a cool touch.

IRON MAN MARK XXI

“Mark XXI, codename ‘Midas,’ is a fully loaded high-altitude suit built by Stark that’s outfitted with enriched gold titanium alloy.”

There are a great number of varieties of Iron Man suits presented by the film’s “House Party” concept.  Many of them are quite unique, while others are really just re-decos of prior armors.  This one’s one of the latter.  Dubbed “Midas,” the Mark XXI is a recolor of Avengers‘ Mark VII, done up in all gold as a reference to Iron Man’s distinctive all-gold armor from the early Silver Age.  Unsurprisingly, the figure is likewise just a re-use of the Mark VII mold.  He stands 6 1/2 inches tall and he has 37 points of articulation.  The sculpt worked well for the Mark VII and it works well for Midas as well.  It’s hard to fault Hasbro for the re-use, especially when the mold is as good as this one.  The color work is changed up, of course, so that he’s now all gold.  It’s a mix of molded plastic and painted sections, so there’s som variety to the finish.  It doesn’t look half bad.  Midas gets the same accessory selection as the Mark VII: two sets of hands and blast effects, all in changed up colors to match with the core figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Happy Hogan is one of those character’s I’ve always loved in the comics, and I’ve been thrilled to see him actually get to grow over the course of his MCU appearances.  I didn’t have the highest hopes for a Legends release, but they’ve been pulling out all the stops recently, so it’s not the craziest thing.  It was definitely cool to see him show up here, and I like that they went with his IM3 appearance.  Midas isn’t one of the more thrilling House Party armors, but the original base figure was nice, and so is this one.  There have been worse space fillers in these two-packs.

#2969: Iron Man Mark III

IRON MAN MARK III

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Tony Stark takes on the world’s worst villains in the Mark 3 suit: a technological wonder equipped with a variety of stunning enhancements and upgrades.”

Back in the early days of this great Legends review journey, when I still was young and hopeful about Marvel Legends, I discussed the earliest days of the MCU, back when it was just Iron Man.  Hasbro didn’t quite have their game down at that point, and while the tie-in figures for Iron Man weren’t bad, there’s certainly some room for updating at this point.  I already looked at Iron Monger, but I’m finally circling back around with a look at the title character, sporting his fancy (at the time, anyway) Mark III armor.  Let’s have a look at that one!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Iron Man Mark III is the second-to-last of the five single-packed standard release figures in the Infinity Saga sub-line of Marvel Legends.  He’s the second of the two Iron Man offerings as well, and only the third officially Iron Man-branded offering under the Legends banner.  He’s based on his appearance in the final third or so of the first film, when Tony’s gotten the armor up and running, but it hasn’t yet taken the beating it would during the battle with Iron Monger.  The figure stands 6 1/2 inches tall and he has 33 points of articulation.  The articulation scheme marks the really big improvement here.  He takes a few pages out of the Mark VII’s book in terms of layout and structure, but also adds in drop hips, a shoulder armor structure similar to the way the Classified Series has been handling them, and just generally a greater range of motion on all of the joints.  The Mark VII was pretty great, and this one just does a little bit better than that.  His all-new sculpt does quite a nice job of capturing the suit’s design from the movie, properly machined and geometric.  As with the VII, the III benefits from a much better scaling to the rest of the Legends line than other MCU Iron Men, which is certainly a plus.  Not quite so much a plus on my figure (and hopefully only on my figure) was the big glob of glue on the front of his full helmeted head.  I was able to remove it most of the way using a knife, but it was certainly no fun, and it results in my figure looking just a touch rougher than I’d like it to.  Beyond that, the QC does seem okay on the figure.  His color work is generally pretty decent.  I quite like the metallic red plastic, and the application on the gold paint is overall pretty cleanly handled.  I also like how they’ve used the printing to do the arc reactor, giving it more of an actual illuminated effect.  The Mark III is packed with an alternate head with the mask flipped up, two sets of hands (fists and open for blast), and three swappable plates for the right forearm, allowing for collapsed, rocket launching, and shield.  I was genuinely surprised by the lack of any repulser effects, but I’m not unhappy with the selection we got.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I fondly remember my Prototype Iron Man from the ’08 line, but, much like Monger, I knew there was definite room for an upgrade.  With all the fancy suits that have followed, it can be easy to overlook the Mark III and its importance in the grand scheme of things, but I’m certainly glad Hasbro didn’t, and finally gave us a really good version of the armor.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2968: Kro

KRO

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“A powerful Deviant unlike any other the Eternals have faced over the millennia, Kro’s appearance is the harbinger for a global threat.”

So, the Eternals reviews aren’t done quite yet.  I know.  There’s perhaps some fear of things dragging out here, especially as I enter into my second month of Marvel Legends reviews, with at least another month on the docket.  Look, just bear with me here, guys.  It’s not my fault that Hasbro decided to just drop literally all of the Marvel Legends at once.  There will be a reprieve.  Eventually.  I mean, there has to be, right?  Oh dear, I think the review’s getting dragged out.  That’s not good.  I really just need to get this one done with.

If there’s one character that suffered from how over-packed Eternals was with characters more than any of the others, it’s almost certainly Kro.  The only named member of the Deviants, and the film’s primary antagonist at its start, the shifts that occur in the film’s narrative kind of cause poor Kro to get lost in the shuffle.  There’s a chance for a good story, and he’s got an interesting angle, but there’s ultimately not enough time for him in an already quite jam-packed movie.  As such, he’s really just there.  He got a toy, and I guess I’m taking a look at that today?  As you can tell, I’m very enthused.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Kro is a deluxe Marvel Legends release, coinciding with the main Eternals assortment, as well as the two exclusive tie-ins.  The figure stands 8 1/4 inches tall and he has either 27 or 31 points of articulation, depending on which set of arms you’re using for him.  Kro’s construction and articulation scheme feel rather similar to the Groot Build-A-Figure, but there are not any parts actually shared between them.  Kro’s sculpt is instead an all-new offering, based, at least in theory, on his design from the film.  Kro evolves slowly over the film’s first half, starting out monstrous, and becoming more humanoid.  The figure is arguably aiming for something close to his final form, since he’s got the more proper facial features and includes a set of actual hands, but the body sculpt is ultimately a bit of a mix of the designs seen throughout the film.  As far as purely technical quality, it’s not a bad looking sculpt, and honestly the amalgamated design isn’t the worst thing in the world, since it does offer a little more representation and coverage of more of the movie’s run-time that way.  It’s just more broad strokes.  It’s also possible that he’s working from an unfinished design for the character, which is further supported by the figure’s visible pins at the elbows and knees, showcasing that this is a mold that was completed before the figures were shelved in 2020 to accommodate the delay in the film’s release.  Kro’s paint work is generally alright.  It seems to match up with what we see on screen, and the gold has some nice fade in and out.  It’s not the most thrilling color scheme, but it’s accurate.  Kro is packed with two sets of forearms, more human ones (with full articulation), and big tendrilly ones.  It’s a shame that they didn’t also give him an extra, more monstrous head, as that would match better with the tendrils, and would also give his more amalgamated appearance just a little more purpose here.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I bought Kro because I was buying everything else.  That was really it.  The design didn’t really speak to me, and I didn’t know the character.  As with the rest of the figures, I was really banking on the movie to sell me on a figure I already owned.  While the movie did that for the other ten, it didn’t really do that for Kro, so he remains, for me, the weakest of this bunch, and a figure that, ultimately, I think I might have been a bit happier passing on.  He’s not *bad*, but he’s not great either.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with the set that built this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2965: Thena

THENA

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“A fierce warrior, Thena has the ability to use cosmic energy to form any handheld weapon she can think of.”

Introduced in Eternals #5, Thena, the second of the two female members of the original Eternals, was, rather unsurprisingly, meant as a stand-in for Athena, Greek goddess of wisdom, amongst others.  She was later retconned to also be the incarnation of Minerva (Athena’s Roman equivalent) who appeared in Red Raven Comics #1 some 36 years earlier, in effect making her one of Marvel’s oldest characters, predating even the name “Marvel.”  Thena is perhaps one of the least changed characters within the film adaptation, where she is played by Angelina Jolie.  I’ll be taking a look at her figure today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Thena is a Target-exclusive Marvel Legends release, the equivalent to Ajak’s Walmart-exclusive release, both of them released to coincide with the main Eternals assortment.  While Thena is certainly a more directly relevant character within the context of the movie, she does spend some of her time separated from the others, and, as perhaps the biggest name in the cast, it makes some sense that a big box store might want to lay claim to her.  In a perfect world, I’d probably swap her and Ikaris, but I can get why this is the direction they went.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and she has 27 points of articulation.  Her articulation scheme is largely the same as the others in the set, with the one slightly odd caveat of her knee joints not actually having knee caps.  It looks odd to say the least.  I mean, it’s hidden by the structure of the boots in just about every pose, but it’s still kind of a weird choice.  Thena’s sculpt is all-new to her, and it’s a pretty respectable recreation of her design as seen in the movie.  Said design is itself a pretty respectable translation of her comics looks.  The only real departure is the headgear, which is now admittedly more Wonder Woman-like than it was before.  The head sculpt is sporting a rather nice likeness of Jolie, certainly one of the best from this whole line-up.  The body sculpt more or less match with the other figures in the set.  The armor detailing is fairly sharp, and the proportions are decently balanced.  The paint work on Thena is all around pretty alright.  The face detailing is quite lifelike, and the hair gets some pretty nice accenting to bring out more of the details.  The armor is a mix of metallic paints and slightly pearlescent plastic, which does a good job of capturing the finish of her armor in the movie.  Thena is by far the best armed of the Eternals figures, as she not only gets two sets of hands, but also a staff, two styles of sword, and a small blade.  After the rest of them were so lacking in any sort of replication of their on screen abilities, it’s certainly nice to see Thena actually get some of the things she crafts in the movie.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I held off on Thena prior to the film, because I just didn’t know how I was going to feel about the character.  While I was able to get Ajak through a trade-in, I was none so lucky with Thena.  After seeing the movie, I felt the need to address that, so I actually went to a Target and bought her.  Crazy, I know.  What a concept.  She’s a rather nice figure, certainly the best accessorized of the set, and really the best overall package deal, I think.  She’d be better served as a non-exclusive, but at least she doesn’t seem to be a very hard to get one.

#2964: Ajak

AJAK

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“The spiritual leader of the Eternals, Ajak can heal others and is able to communicate with the Celestials.”

Eternals, like a lot of recent MCU stuff, has its main tie-in assortment that’s at mass retail, and then a few off-shoots to that main assortment, with two in particular being store exclusive offerings.  I’m looking at the first of those two today.  Ajak was introduced in Jack Kirby’s second issue of Eternals, with his primary role being that of communicator to the Celestials.  For the purposes of the film, the now female Ajak, played by Selma Hayek, is still the communicator to the Celestials, but also serves as a more direct leader for the Eternals on Earth, given their more cohesive team nature in the film.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Ajak is a Walmart-exclusive Marvel Legends release, who hit at roughly the same time as the main Eternals assortment.  I normally decry characters being made Walmart-exclusive, but Ajak is actually not a bad choice for the exclusive treatment.  Her role in the film is certainly an important one, but it also has her removed from the rest of the group, and therefore the separate releases honestly makes a little bit of sense.  I’d still prefer no exclusives, but it one of them was destined for this role, she’s the right choice.  The figure stands about 6 inches tall and she has 27 points of articulation.  Her articulation scheme is pretty much the same as the other female figures, though, like Druid, the design of her skirt means that most of her leg articulation is greatly restricted.  She’s an all-new sculpt, based on her design from the movie.  Ajak’s design in the comics keeps some of the broad-strokes elements and silhouette of the comics character’s design, but makes it something a bit more streamlined, as well as more within the general theme of the other movie Eternals designs.  The sculpt does an alright job of translating it.  The head has a decent Selma Hayek likeness, certainly on the higher end of the likenesses in the set.   It does sit a little bit funny on the neck joint, but it’s otherwise not bad.  The paint work on the figure is generally pretty alright.  It’s fairly cleanly applied, and there aren’t any notable misalignments like on some of the other figures, which is certainly a plus.  Ajak is packed with an alternate head without the helmet piece, as well as two sets of hands, in fists and open gesture.  The alternate head also has a respectably Hayek likeness, and even sports a slightly friendlier expression than the standard.  She still gets no effects or anything, but at this point it’s not really a surprise or anything.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I’m not in a rush to get anything that’s a Walmart exclusive, because that would require either stepping foot in a Walmart or trusting Walmart’s website, and none of those is a pleasant experience.  So, I was content to play the waiting game with Ajak.  As luck would have it, I didn’t really need to, because just a few short days after getting my standard release set, someone brought a whole set of Eternals, including Ajak, into All Time.  It’s hard to pass on something when it literally just walks through the door for you, so, hey, I got an Ajak, no muss, no fuss.  After seeing the movie, I was certainly glad, because Ajak’s a cool character, and she makes for a pretty cool figure as well.

#2963: Gilgamesh

GILGAMESH

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

The strongest and kindest Eternal, Gilgamesh becomes Thena’s de facto partner when the events of the past exile them from the other Eternals.”

Introduced in Eternals #13, the character that would become Gilgamesh wasn’t actually named at all, being simply dubbed “The Forgotten One,” as he was an Eternal exiled from the rest, who had actually taken many names over the millennia.  Upon meeting back up with the main Eternals, he went by the simple monicker “Hero.”  It wasn’t until he joined the Avengers in the ’80s that he finally took up the name Gilgamesh, with the rationale behind it being shared with the ancient mythological figure was that he *was* the ancient mythological figure.  The movie opts to just name him from the beginning, which is honestly the best call, because, you know, everyone else gets to start with names, right?

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Gilgamesh is the Build-A-Figure for the Eternals tie-in assortment of Marvel Legends.  He’s spread across the six non-Ikaris Eternals in the set.  The figure stands 6 3/4 inches tall and he has 29 points of articulation.  His articulation scheme is pretty much the same as all of the other male Eternals.  It’s generally pretty good, but the hips are slightly restricted, and, unfortunately, even though we had that uptick with Druig, we’re back to the more reserved neck mobility.  Alas.  At least the mid-torso movement is a bit better on this one.  Gilgamesh gets an all-new sculpt based on his movie design.  In the comics, Gilgamesh has had several designs, all of them quite different from each other.  Rather than trying to replicate any of them, the movie design instead tries to tie him in more with the rest of the group.  It’s not super distinctive, but it’s also not the worst looking thing either.  And believe you me, Gilgamesh has had his fair share of the worst looking things.  The sculpt is pretty solid.  He’s notably larger than the other figures, which is cool.  The likeness on the head’s not a bad match for actor Don Lee, which I’d also count as a plus.  In general, it’s just a good translation of the movie design into figure form.  His paint work is generally pretty decent.  The face gets the printing, which is solid, and the base application’s not terrible.  There’s just a touch of misalignment on the green in a few spots, but it’s not as bad as some of the others in the set.  Despite being a BaF, Gilgamesh does actually get two sets of hands.  It’s a pair of fists and a pair of gripping.  Not entirely sure why, since he’s got nothing to grip, but I guess it’s nice that he has something at all.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Gilgamesh is the character I knew the most about barring Sersi going into the film, as I recalled his time with the Avengers.  That was not a point in his favor, mind you, because he’s not a character I’ve ever had any sort of attachment to.  He’s about as interesting as a yawn, in the comics at least.  So I certainly wasn’t poised to like the guy.  Kudos to the movie, because damn if they didn’t actually make me care about Gilgamesh.  Good on yo, movie.  The figure isn’t notably different than the rest of the set that builds him, but he, like the whole assortment, is a pretty solid offering all around, and I’m glad I opted to build him.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with the set that built this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#2962: Druig

DRUIG

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Using cosmic energy to control the minds of others, Druig is aloof and powerful, but at times it’s hard to determine whether he is friend or foe.”

Introduced in the same issue of Eternals as Kingo, Druig is somewhat the black sheep of the Eternals family.  This is demonstrated ever so subtly by the fact that he dresses in all black.  You might have missed that if I hadn’t pointed it out to you, right?  In many ways, Druig owes a lot of his portrayal in the comics to common portrayals of Hades, as a sort of dark brooding figure who isn’t inherently the bad guy, but is often at odds with the more heroically inclined gods.  While the comics and the lead up to the movie all hinted at Druig being something of an antagonistic force in the film, the movie proper doesn’t really get into that at all, painting Druig as a generally well-meaning guy whose power set makes it harder for him to be as sociable as the others.  Honestly, going back to the Hades comparison, they crafted a decent parallel to Hades in the actual myths, where he’s generally not a bad guy, he just kind of wants to be left alone with his stuff.  It’s not a take you see get much proper due, so I generally liked it.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Druig is figure 6 in the Gilgamesh Series of Marvel Legends.  He’s the final non-exclusive standard single release for the line-up.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 29 points of articulation.  The articulation scheme is the same as the other male Eternals, but notably the legs are quite restricted because of how long the skirt piece is.  There’s some fine tuning that can be had to keep him standing, but no deep posing with the legs.  They did at least give him full movement, though, so there’s some credit due there.  Additionally, while I wasn’t big on the range of neck movement for Ikaris or Kingo, Druig actually gets a really nice range, which is super useful.  Druig’s sculpt an all-new piece, and it’s honestly one of the nicest in the bunch.  The head sports a pretty spot on likeness of Barry Keoghan, which is honestly the best likeness of the bunch.  It’s incredibly lifelike, and this is one figure where the very neutral expression makes perfect sense for the character.  The body sculpt is pretty good, too.  Again, he’s got a slightly different build than the others, and the detailing on the armor is all pretty sleek.  Druig’s paint work is generally pretty good.  The head gets some really nice printing, which just adds more to the lifelike quality.  The body does alright, but it’s worth noting that the red detailing on his skirt for my figure is misaligned, so it doesn’t match the sculpt.  This is an ongoing issue with the whole set, so it’s far from surprising.  Druig is packed with two sets of hands (which appear to be the same ones included with Ikaris), as well as the head of Gilgamesh.  The lack of an alternate head demonstrating Druig’s pupil-less eyes from when he’s using his powers is really criminal here, since it wouldn’t even require a new sculpt.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Again, Druig is a character I knew very little about going into this set.  I wasn’t sure I was going to like him, and I wasn’t sure about this figure.  The figure proved a surprise, and the character even more of one.  Druig wound up as one of my favorites in the movie, and the figure does him a lot of justice.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.