#2146: Reinhardt

REINHARDT

OVERWATCH ULTIMATES (HASBRO)

Because I’m something of a glutton for punishment, I like to do things to myself such as grouping up reviews of things with which I’m not overly familiar.  Case in point: Overwatch.  My knowledge of the game really just comes from the toy I’ve seen that accompany it, which certainly makes for a slightly askew idea of what the whole thing is about, I suppose.  A pretty regular fixture of the tie-in stuff is today’s offering, Reinhardt, the big tanky guy!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Reinhardt is a solo release as part of the Overwatch Ultimates line from Hasbro.  His release coincided with the first series, but he himself was far too large to fit into a standard assortment package.  Measuring 7 1/2 inches tall and almost as wide, he’s certainly the biggest figure offered up in this line, and size wise he’s comparable to a Marvel Legends Build-A-Figure.  He has 30 points of articulation, making him rather mobile for someone quite so bulky.  Obviously, there’s a bit of restriction on some of the joints, he is a big tank and all, but it’s not quite as limited as you might think at first glance, especially with his articulated shoulder pads and skirt piece.  Another nice thing about all the articulation is that it helps him really plant his feet soundly and keep standing, a definite plus when it comes to a figure as heavy and potentially destructive as this one.  Reinhardt is a solid construction, so he’s certainly a heavy boy.  Reinhardt’s sculpt is a pretty clean translation of his design from the game, and certainly gets that appropriate giant mecha feel that he has there.  The soft plastic for his head means that his horns cane out of the package a little misshapen, but he’s other wise free from any major QC issues.  Even the paint work on him is pretty solidly handled.  Application is clean and crisp, and the colors are bold and eye catching.  There’s a touch of slop on the edges of some of the yellows, but nothing too terrible.  Reinhardt is packed with his hammer, which is a little difficult to get into his hands at first, but one it’s there, it’s not going anywhere.  He’s also got his shield, which is quite sizable and honestly looks more like a serving tray than something from a toy.  It mounts to his arm, and includes two stands for extra stability.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I may not know much about the game, but when Hasbro showed off Reinhardt, I was definitely interested.  His design is definitely a solid one, and looked like it would make for a cool toy.  When Game Stop was running a sale, it was hard to say no.  I’m pretty happy with this figure.  He’s just a solid toy, and doesn’t feel super overpriced given what you get with him.  He also sets a nice precedent of Hasbro selling larger figures in ways other than as BaFs, which I’m on board for.

Advertisements

#2145: Ana & Soldier: 76

ANA — SHRIKE & SOLDIER: 76

OVERWATCH ULTIMATES(HASBRO)

“Years after the collapse of Overwatch, Soldier 76 recruits Ana Amari to rejoin the fight.”

You guys remember when I was reviewing Fortnite figures despite knowing absolutely nothing about Fortnite?  Are you ready to go down that road again, but slightly different?  Before Fortnite, the gaming sensation that had everybody all a titter was Overwatch.  Apart from a line of Pop!s from Funko, there was really not much merch when the game was really big, but now that things have died down, there’s been a push to merchandise it some more.  After missing out on the main Fortnite figure license, Hasbro decided to jump on the Overwatch bandwagon.  And, where Hasbro goes, it appears I follow, so let’s just look at the figures, shall we?

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Ana and Soldier: 76 are one of the pair of two-packs (the other being Mercy and Pharah) accompanying the first series of Hasbro’s Overwatch Ultimates line.  They started hitting shelves around the beginning of the summer.

ANA — SHRIKE

So, Ana.  She’s…a member of Overwatch?  And a sniper, I guess?  Apparently she’s one of the older members of the team, and linked pretty closely with Soldier: 76 and Reaper.  This figure is based not on her standard appearance, but rather on her time as the vigilante Shrike, sometime in the game’s past.  I think.  I’m not sure, because, you know, not really familiar with the source material.  The main difference with this particular design is that she’s got a full faceplate thing, which is actually a pretty solid design element, which I can certainly get behind.  The figure stands a little under 6 inches tall and she has 27 points of articulation.  Ana’s an all-new sculpt, and she goes for the base figure with a bunch of overlays set-up.  The hood and jacket in particular are separate pieces, and are free-floating.  For the hood, it’s not a big deal, but for the jacket, it means it pops up and down a lot and just generally looks a little goofy.  It contributes to the overall rather flimsy feel to this figure.  There are also a few issues with how the articulation is worked into the sculpt.  The legs are generally pretty well-handled, but the arms really seem to suffer from some design choices.  The elbows don’t have a ton of range, and don’t even quite make a 90 degree bend, which definitely limits the posing options on the figure.  On the plus side, Ana’s paintwork isn’t bad.  It’s mostly pretty basic stuff, but the application is clean, and the colors are nice and contrasting.  Ana is packed with two sets of hands (relaxed and gripping), a rifle, a pistol, and an blast effect piece.

SOLDIER: 76

Soldier: 76!  He’s a patriotic super-soldier from the past.  Now there’s a concept I can grasp!  Unlike Ana, Soldier: 76 is based on his main game appearance.  As the most played character in the game (according to the wiki, anyway), I guess it makes sense to go with the basic look?  It helps that it’s honestly his best look, I suppose.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  Solder: 76’s sculpt is a much better balance of the various elements than Ana’s.  His articulation is far better worked into the sculpt, and far less restricted.  It’s implemented in a very similar fashion to the Lightning Collection figures, which I certainly don’t have a problem with.  Also, most of the costume is sculpted right on the core figure, with the add-ons only being for his shoulder straps and belt.  In Ana’s defense, Soldier: 76 does get something of a leg up here, with his design just generally being far more fit for translation to a figure.  Whatever the case, the sculpt is a faithful recreation of his in-game model; so faithful, in fact, that it leads to my only real complaint about the sculpt.  Soldier: 76’s game model has a holstered sidearm, which is never taken out.  This figure has that same element, and it’s ever so slightly frustrating that it’s not actually a proper gun.  Soldier: 76’s paint work is generally pretty decent, but I did notice a fair bit more slop on this guy than I’ve seen on most Hasbro figures as of late.  There’s also some noticeable spots on the “76” on the back of his jacket.  It’s nothing figure-breaking, but Hasbro has certainly done better.  76 is packed with two sets of hands (gripping and fists), his rifle, and a missile effect piece.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I know nothing about the game, so when these figures were first shown off, I wasn’t in on them.  When they started showing up in-person, I spotted this set at a Walmart, and as cool as it looked, I still opted to pass on in, because, as I noted, I know nothing about the game, and the figures are a little bit on the expensive side for that sort of thing.  While on vacation, my Xbox controller died, so we took a trip to the local Gamestop to trade it in for a new one.  While there, I again spotted this set, but now with a pretty decent sale attached to it, meaning that I effectively paid the price of one figure for the pair.  I was mostly buying it for Soldier: 76, and he’s honestly a really fun figure, definitely worth what I put into the set.  That’s a good thing, because Ana’s really not all that impressive.  There are some cool ideas there, but she just ends up “meh.”  It’s a good thing she’s got 76 to carry her.

#2112: Havoc

HAVOC

FORTNITE: LEGENDARY SERIES (JAZWARES)

Hey, remember Fortnite, that video game that I have no attachment to, and yet from which I still managed to pick up five action figures?  Yeah…now it’s six.  In my defense, Fortnite merch is kind of unavoidable at this point.  We already had the 3 3/4-inch Jazwares offerings (which were my main focus), plus some Pops, and even Hasbro getting in on things under their Nerf banner.  More directly competing with Jazwares in the action figure department was McFarlane, who have a line of 7-inch figures that have been running since right around the same time.  Jazwares have decided to up the ante, and get in with some 6-inch figures, undercutting McFarlane a bit, if you will.  I still don’t care about Fortnite, but I do care about good toys, so let’s see how Jazwares fares, shall we?

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Havoc is part of the first series of Jazwares’ Fortnite: Legendary Series.  Rather amusingly, he and the rest of the assortment started hitting right as Havoc joined the smaller scale line from Jazwares as well.  Not knowing much about the game, I can’t speak to Havoc’s relevance in the line, or how he relates to his assortment-mates, but I do know that in the game’s lore, he’s the brother of Raptor, which I guess explains their similar designs.  The figure stands just over 6 inches tall and sports 40 points of articulation, a fact that the package proudly states, much like the Toy Biz Marvel Legends of old.  Speaking of the Toy Biz Legends, remember how I mentioned the smaller scale line feeling like a successor to the 25th Anniversary G.I. Joes?  Well, this line does the same thing for Toy Biz’s Legends.  Hasbro’s figures have become their own breed, but this guy genuinely feels like he could have been a late-run Toy Biz product, albeit with some slight adjustments to fix some of the issues those figures have suffered from hindsight.  This figure brings back things that aren’t as common place these days, notably hinged fingers and toes.  The fingers worried me a bit, as a good number of the old Toy Biz figures had some major troubles holding accessories due to the joints, and these guys kind of need to be able to hold their accessories.  Fortunately, it seems like Jazwares was aware of the potential issues, and sculpted the hands to hold the accessories first, and added the joints after.  This means Havoc still maintains a decent grip on his weapons, while having a little more freedom of posability when not holding anything.  Additionally, no wrenching open of the fingers is needed to get the accessories in place, which I’d call a plus.  Havoc also makes use of butterfly shoulder joints, well hidden by his gear, plus pretty much every joint you would consider standard for a Legend.  His sculpt stays true to the animation models (meaning he’s got easy re-use potential for Jazwares to do Raptor), while still maintaining a decent level of detailing.  There’s a slight stylization to him, but not enough that he can’t fit in with more realistic lines.  In order to keep things fresh, one of the gimmicks of this line is swappable faceplates for differing expressions and the like.  Havoc includes three, one fairly standard, one surprised, and one with the mask pulled up to reveal the face beneath.  The three faces swap out relatively easy, but stay in place securely once clicked in, and the seam where they join is pretty well hidden.  Havoc’s paintwork is pretty solid stuff.  It’s mostly pretty basic work, but there’s a decent amount of accenting as well.  Additionally, unlike the small-scale Raptor, his eyes have been placed and sized correctly, so he doesn’t look wonky either.  In addition to the previously mentioned faceplates, Havoc is packed with a scoped assault rifle, a harvesting tool, his back bling, a chug jug, and a grenade.  It’s a nice assortment of extras, especially when compared to the basic smaller figures.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Just when I think I’m out, they pull me back in!  Seriously, I thought I’d kicked the Fortnite habit, and then Jazwares went and announced this line, and boy did they look cool.  I singled this guy out as the one I wanted to grab to try out the line because his name is “Havoc” and I’m a creature of habit.  As luck would have it, there was a single Havoc left at a Walmart I swung by on my way home from work, giving me the opportunity to give the line a try.  I was very impressed with the small scale line, and I’m even more impressed with Havoc here.  I will definitely be grabbing a few other figures from this line.  Darn it.

#1929: Omega

OMEGA

FORTNITE (JAZWARES)

Oh boy.  More Fortnite.  Remember Fortnite?  That thing I said I had no attachment to, but for which I have now written four reviews? Yeah.  That’s the one.  For what it’s worth, this us my last Fortnite review, at least for the foreseeable future.  Somewhat appropriately for my last review of this set, I’m going to be taking a look at Omega!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Omega was released in the “Early Game Survival Kit”, a slightly more deluxe offering from Jazwares’ Fortnite line, which falls right between the “Solo Mode” and “Drama Llama” offerings.  The figure stands 4 inches tall and he has 28 points of articulation.  In the game, Omega is a progressive skin, meaning he starts out rather basic, and gains new armor as the player progresses.  The Omega seen here is a fully kitted-out version, which I suppose is a sensible choice.  His construction is the same styling as the other Fortnite figures, so he’s a pretty solid little toy with a decent spread of articulation.  The only slight downstep from others is this figure’s more restricted elbow movement, but he’s still getting more than 45 degrees, so we’re not quite at Mattel levels.  The sculpt does a solid job of recreating the in-game design, though like the others, the detailing can be a little soft in some spots.  He’s certainly helped by the design’s more simplistic nature, which just makes for a clean overall figure.  The paintwork is decent, if perhaps not anything amazing.  I like the metallic finish, and the application is overall pretty good.  There’s a little bit of slop, especially on the red lines, but given the scale and the price point, he’s certainly passable.  The more deluxe nature of this release means that he’s a little better accessorized than Raptor was, but not *quite* as accessory heavy as Rust Lord.  He gets a Legendary Assault Rifle, the Onslaught harvesting tool, Precision back pack, Wet Paint Glider, and a foot-peg-bearing building plate.  It’s a nice little taste of all the differing accessory types.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Despite being my last of the reviews, Omega was actually the second Fortnite item I acquired.  Super Awesome Fiancee’s store had gotten him in, and after I was so happy with Rust-Lord, she asked me if I might also like this guy.  I’m hardly one to turn down someone buying me a cool action figure, so I of course took her up on it.  Omega is another solid toy from this line, and I definitely dig it.

#1915: Turbo Builder Set

TURBO BUILDER SET (W/ JONESY & RAVEN)

FORTNITE (JAZWARES)

Well, with another week of Post-Christmas reviews under my belt, and a theme thoroughly exhausted, let’s go back to the beginning.  Yep, I started this year’s round of gift reviews off with a Fortnite item, and here I am with another.  I know, I’m as surprised as all of you.  With my last Fortnite review being on the smaller side, I’m jumping over the other end of the spectrum, and taking a look at one of the largest offerings in the line, the Turbo Builder Set, featuring Jonesy and Raven!

THE SET ITSELF

The Turbo Builder Set is the largest offering so far from Jazwares’ Fortnite line.  It’s made up of the two figures, the AC/DC and standard pickaxe harvesting tools, the hunting rifle, revolver, submachine gun, tactical shotgun, and, of course, the main focus, a whopping 81 building plates, evenly divided between wooden planks, sheet metal, and brick and mortar.  There are a lot of building options with the plates, and they are of course completely inter-compatible with the ones included with Rust Lord and Raptor.  They can be a little tricky to assemble and take back apart multiple times, which led to a few broken connectors on mine, but with the sheer quantity offered here, I don’t foresee it being too much of an issue.

JONESY

Jonesy is another character that seems to be leaning heavily on the G.I. Joe end of the spectrum, and also being about as standard issue as you can get.  There are a lot of potential variants of Jonesy, but this one seems to be based on his “Survival” variant, which again looks to be using some pretty standard issue looks.  The figure stands 4 inches tall and has 28 points of articulation.  He’s built in the same fashion as the last two figures I looked at, meaning there are a number of similarities to the 25th Anniversary Joes.  Jonesy has the first parts re-use I’ve seen in the line, with a small handful of parts being shared with the Rust Lord figures.  It’s just the lower arms, lower legs, and pelvis, which appear to be pretty similar elements in game as well.  I was surprised by how few of those parts were actually re-used, given that some of the uniquely sculpted parts are just small tweaks away from being the same.  Hey, I’m not going to knock the attention to detail, though.  Jonesy’s head is further on the cartoony side of things than some of the line’s other offerings, which I’m not huge on, because it’ll make slotting him in with Joes a little harder.  That said, it’s still a decent enough sculpt, and it’s pretty accurate to the game design.  His paintwork is pretty decently handled.  Application is clean, and there don’t appear to be any missing applications.  I was also quite impressed by the tattoo on his right arm; that’s a nice attention to detail.

RAVEN

Definitely the most unique of the figures I’ve looked at from this line, Raven moves away from the knock-off G.I. Joe bit that the others possess.  Raven’s design is one of the ones that’s a bit more dependent on the game’s animation style to sell it, which makes its translation to toy form a little more difficult.  The end result is okay, but not quite as impressive as I’d hoped.  The biggest letdown is the implementation of his head; in the game, he’s got a hood that obscures is face, so that all you can see are his eyes peering out.  I was expecting something along the lines of a Moon Knight figure, with a featureless black head underneath of a sculpted hood.  Instead, the figure has an empty head with some eyes sculpted on it.  It’s pretty shallow, so it never seems to look quite right, especially when directly lit.  The design of the body also ends up limiting the articulation a bit more than usual, especially in the arms.  Beyond that, there are still some nice details worked throughout, and he’s still a generally enjoyable figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

As I touched on in my Black Series reviews, there was some slight worry about those figures not arriving in time for Christmas.  Since they were going to be my main gift, Super Awesome Fiancee wanted to make sure I had *something* and since I’d mentioned this set in passing when I got Rust Lord, she tracked one down for me.  Of course the Black Series figures ended up arriving on time, so I guess it just worked out well for me.  Jonesy’s another for my “augmenting my Joes” venture, Raven’s a flawed but entertaining figure, and the building plates are certainly going to make for some fun diorama building.  All in all, another winning piece from this line.  I hope that Jazwares can keep it up!

#1901: Raptor

RAPTOR

FORTNITE (JAZWARES)

And let the gift reviews commence.  Yes, it’s the most wonderful time of the year!  The post-Christmas season, when I have a ton of new toys to review here.  As per usual, I’ll be kicking off the post-Christmas reviews with sort of a Day 0 kind of a review, with my one non-Christmas gift of the season.

Remember a few weeks ago when I reviewed one of them there Fortfighters?  Crap, I mean Fortnite.  Yeah, that’s the one.  Despite my very obvious lack of prior knowledge of the source material, I was enamored by the toys.  I kind of foresee a good number of reviews from this line forthcoming.  Today, I’m keeping things pretty basic, and looking at Raptor, Royal Air Force Test Pilot!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Raptor is part of the first series of the basic “Solo Mode” figures from Jazwares’ Fortnite line.  He doesn’t come in the impressive packaging that Rust Lord did, nor does he feature quite as many fancy parts, but he’s also less than half the retail price.  The figure stands just shy of 4 inches tall and he has 28 points of articulation.  His construction is very similar to the previously reviewed Rust Lord figure, though his actual sculpt is completely unique.  While I think the general assembly of Rust Lord is a little more solid and better fit together, I certainly can’t fault this guy’s sculpt.  It helps that, like Rust Lord, his design lends itself pretty nicely to a toy translation.  I mean, the guy is perhaps the most blatant G.I. Joe rip-off of the bunch.  That’s pretty basic toy stuff right there.  Raptor is a bit more simple than Rust Lord when it comes to actual detailing, with the main exception being his ski mask, which does actually get some solid work.  I was sort of hoping for a bit more to his bomber jacket, but this is, admittedly, fairly true to the game design.  Raptor’s paint is a little bit of a mixed bag.  There’s a lot I like, especially the things like the insignias on his shoulders.  However, the thing that bugs me the most about the figure is completely to do with the paint, and that’s the eyes.  They’re not *terrible*, but they’re definitely too big, especially relative to what’s sculpted.  Eyes are, admittedly, hard to do, especially at this scale, but as his only visible facial feature, it’s unfortunate they aren’t more on the mark.  Raptor is a lighter release, in contrast to the more heavily armed Rust Lord.  He gets a pick axe and a building plate with a foot peg on it.  I like the variety among the plates, and I can definitely appreciate the inclusion of a melee weapon this time around, especially after getting so many guns with Rust Lord.  They’re really encouraging the play pattern here, and I can get behind that.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Raptor here was an anniversary gift from Super Awesome Fiancee, exchanged on Christmas Eve, as is our tradition.  After I raved so much about how cool Rust Lord was, she kept an eye out for the rest of the line, and thought I’d like this one.  Slight flaws aside, I really do like this figure, and he continues the “augmenting G.I. Joe” thing I started with Rust Lord.

#1888: Rust Lord

RUST LORD

FORTNITE (JAZWARES)

Oh man, let me tell you guys, today’s review?  It’s totally lit.  Like, it’s at peak levels of on-fleek-ness.  This review here?  It’s cool AF.  This is about the dankest review you’re ever gonna read.  I’m finna about to review this boi, which, I assure you, is not empty.  Yeet.  Stick with me fam, things are about to get hella turnt! …am I doing this right?  Is this how we talk about the Fortfight?  I’m sorry, I don’t have the 411 on what’s hip these days.  But, in an effort to get home with the downies, I got one of these here Fortniters to review.  Swag.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

So, homeslice here is Rust Lord, an absolute unite, who is one of the many available skins in Fortnite.  He’s a part of Jazwares Fortnite line, available exclusively in the “Llama Drama Loot Piñata” pack, which was the first item available from Jazwares’ line, first showing up on shelves at the beginning of the month.  The figure stands just shy of 4 inches tall and he has 28 points of articulation.  Stylistically, Rust Lord is very similar to Hasbro’s 25th Anniversary GI Joes, though perhaps a bit heftier.  He’ll fit in pretty well, though.  What surprised me most about this figure, though, was the articulation, which honestly is a bit of a step-up from the Joes, and even rivals the likes of Marvel Legends, but at a smaller scale.  Despite all of this articulation, the construction of the figure is still really solid, and he’s not flimsy at all.  Rust Lord’s design is definitely one that lends itself pretty well to a toy.  The figure changes up a few proportional elements, in order to make for a better translation to toy, but he’s actually pretty close.  The sculpt is clean and pretty sharp, which is honestly a fair bit better than I’m used to seeing with figures at this scale, even from the likes of Hasbro.  The paintwork for Rust Lord is fairly cleanly handled.  It’s pretty striking, and, like the sculpt, it will help him to match alright with Joes.  There are a handful of unpainted details here and there, but for the most part, he gets the job done.  Rust Lord himself only makes up a small piece of what’s included in the Loot Piñata.  There are also a whopping ten weapons*, four backpacks, and eight building plates.  For weapons, he has an assault rifle, bolt-action sniper rifle, drum gun, grenade launcher, legendary assault rifle, legendary burst assault rifle, light machine gun, pump shotgun, rocket launcher, and suppressed submachine gun.  Some of the sculpts are a little cartoony for my taste, but they’re mostly pretty solid pieces, and, like the main figure, they should do well arming your Joes and the like.  For the backpacks, he has the Bright Bag, Cuddle Bow, Satchel, and Scaly.  The satchel’s the only one that really matches up with the figure, but the options are nice nevertheless.  Lastly, there are the building plates.  Two sets of four line-up for some graffiti, and can be configured into all manner of different structures.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

This is all Max from All Time’s fault.  A couple weeks ago, he told me about this set, showed me a few pictures of his and said “it’s kind of like G.I. Joe,” which was enough to sell me.  I’m an easy mark, I guess.  As someone with absolutely no experience with Fortnite, these figures weren’t even on my radar.  Doubly so when I found out they were produced by Jazwares, a company that I generally find to be the toy world’s equivalent of a yawn.  This figure has no right to be anywhere near as cool as it is, but I’ll be damned if this isn’t one of the coolest, most solidly crafted figures I’ve picked up as of late.  I’ve still got no attachment to Fortnite, but I’ll definitely be finding a spot for this guy with my Joes.

*My set actually had 11 weapons, thanks to me getting an extra drum gun in my set.  One of those few times an error totally worked out in my favor.

#1853: Spider-Man

SPIDER-MAN

MARVEL LEGENDS GAMERVERSE (HASBRO)

“Now a seasoned Super Hero, Peter Parker has been busy keeping crime off the streets as Spider-Man.  Just as he’s ready to focus on life as Peter, a new villain threatens New York City.  Faced with overwhelming odds and higher stakes, Spider-Man must rise up and be greater.”

I had originally planned to continue the Star Wars thing today, but with the passing of comics-legend Stan Lee yesterday afternoon, I’ve decided to shift focus for the purposes of today’s entry.  I never met Stan Lee, but for 23 of my 26 years, he managed to influence every day of my life, be it directly through his introductory segments during the Marvel Action Hour in the ‘90s and his numerous cameos in all of the Marvel films since, or indirectly through the universe he helped to create, and all the characters he created to populate it, and all of the important messages that he would use them to tell.  The man influenced the lives of a great many people he never even met, and taught a lot of us how to be the best versions of ourselves, while at the same time reminding us that nobody’s perfect, and that’s okay too.  Stan had great power, and he did his very best to use it responsibly.  The creation Stan was always the proudest of was Spider-Man, and so I feel it’s only fitting that in his honor, I take a look at a Spider-Man figure.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Spider-Man is the inaugural release in the Marvel Legends Gamerverse line, which, as you may have gathered from the name, is a line devoted to the current crop of Marvel video games.  Spidey here is based on his appearance in the recent PS4-exclusive Spider-Man game, which hit just a few months ago.  The figure was initially supposed to hit closer to the game, then was pushed back to December, and then was moved up again.  The important thing is that he actually made it out.  So, yay.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 34 points of articulation.  He’s built entirely from re-used parts, but Hasbro’s got a substantial enough library that it’s a reasonable way of handling certain figures, this one included.  He’s built on the 2099 body, and makes use of the head from Spider-UK.  Interestingly, this means we have a Peter Parker figure that’s not built from any Peter Parker parts.  The end result is a figure that actually has something of a John Romita Sr-styling to him (I’d love to see this same combo done up in a classic deco), which definitely works for the game’s version of our favorite wall-crawler.  The paintwork for this figure is, of course, its main selling point, since that’s what truly signifies it as a video game Spidey.  The design is nice and distinctive, and the paint is crisply applied and a solid match for the in-game appearance, all while still maintaining the currently running Legends aesthetic. Spidey is packed with two different sets of hands in thwipping poses and fists, as well as a two of the new webline piece we first saw with the House of M Spidey.  It’s a nice selection of extras, especially in light of some of the recent Spidey variants lacking the extra hands and such.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I’ve liked the PS4 Spidey design since it was first shown off, and was definitely hoping for a figure of some sort, so when this guy was announced, I knew I’d want to get one.  Super Awesome Fiancee was nice enough to pre-order him for me through her store, which proved an especially helpful move, since this guy’s proved rather scarce since his release.  Despite being made up totally of re-used parts, this is one of my favorite Spider-Men of recent years.  He’s just an entertaining figure all-around, and a good fit for today’s theme.

Excelsior!

#1776: Motorized Patriot

MOTORIZED PATRIOT — BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

BIOSHOCK INFINITE (NECA)

“Originally constructed by Fink MFG. to serve as tour guides for the residents of Columbia, the Motorized Patriots now serve as a standing guard for the entire city.  Fearless and unrelenting, without a shred of self preservation, the Patriots will track down and eliminate any opposition without remorse.  Will you be able to find the right combination to defeat these automated monstrosities?”

You guys ready to play another game of Ethan reviews a figure from a video game he’s never played?  Oh yeah, let’s do this!  The game I’ve never played this time is Bioshock Infinite, the third game in the Bioshock series, a whole series of games I’ve never played.  But this one has cool old-timey motorized robot automaton things, which in turn make for cool action figures.  And that’s by far the most important thing for me.  So, without further ado, here’s the Motorized Patriot.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

The Benjamin Franklin Motorized Patriot is the second to last release in NECA’s Bioshock Infinite line.  He’s the second of the Motorized Patriot after the George Washington version from earlier in the line.  Unlike Washington, who was actually in the game, Franklin is just a concept figure.  The figure stands 9 1/4 inches tall and he has 19 points of articulation.  Ben shares most of his pieces with the first Motorized Patriot.  The movement on the joints is a little bit stiff, especially on the legs.  That right knee in particular doesn’t have much budge to it.  With that said, you can definitely get the basic standing poses the Patriots stand in in-game, and he’s pretty stable.  The body sculpt is up to NECA’s usual standards, with sharp, crisp detailing on the uniform, and some very nice dynamic work on the folds and wrinkles, which matches up pretty decently with the game stylings.  This figure removes the shoulder pauldrons from the Washington Patriot, which actually does quite a bit to change up the general shaping of the figure, and sell him as a more unique “character.”  Also helping sell him as a new character is the unique head, which captures the classical Ben Franklin image.  It does look perhaps slightly off on the thinner Washington body, but it’s a solid sculpt in its own right.  In contrast to Washington, Ben gets to keep both of his eyes, though one of his lids is broken, helping to keep up that sort of creepy appearance.  The paint work on Ben is pretty impressive.  He swaps out the blue of Washington’s military jacket for a deep purple, which works quite well for the design.  The application is all quite clean, and the accent work on his uniform does a lot of favors for the sculpt.  The Patriot’s primary accessory is his main weapon, the Peppermill gatling gun.  It features a spinning barrel and a rotating handle, and is just generally a pretty cool piece.  The only slight downside is that the handles are the slightest bit too big for the figure’s hands, which can easily cause breakage if you aren’t careful.  Fortunately, you can pretty easily mod the figure’s hands by cutting the connection between in thumb and forefinger, and that saves a lot of trouble.  The Patriot also includes a pair of Columbia flags, for mounting on the figure’s back, as well as an alternate head, sans the Franklin mask, which is also appropriately creepy.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Back when these figures were new, I totally meant to get one of these guys.  I was trying to pick between Washington and Franklin, and just ended up getting distracted by other things.  So, why end up with one now?  Well, as you may have noticed, the number for this review is 1776, so I wanted something appropriately festive, and I remembered these guys.  Fortunately, I was able to get some assistance from my friends at All Time Toys, who were able to secure me this guy for this review.  I think if I had the choice, I might have instead gone for Washington, but this one is still really, really solid.

If you want one of these for your very own, he’s still in stock with All Time, so check him out here.  Or, if your looking for something else, make sure to check out their web store and their eBay storefront.

#1690: Claptrap

CLAPTRAP

BORDERLANDS (MCFARLANE)

“A general purpose CL4P-TP robot manufactured by Hyperion, Claptrap acts as the Vault Hunter’s (sometimes) useful guide and quest-giver on Pandora. Programmed with an overenthusiastic personality, Claptrap masks his fear and loneliness behind cheerful bravado.”

What happens when you cross R2-D2 and Jar-Jar Binks?  Claptrap.  Okay, well that’s what some people think, anyway.  I don’t quite agree.  Claptrap’s nowhere near as annoying as Jar-Jar.  That said, he’s cetainly more talkative than R2.  Or at least more fluent in English.  Anyway, he’s by far the most merchandised character from the Borderlands, so it wasn’t much of a shock that he turned up as one of the earlier offerings from McFarlane’s Borderlands toyline.  I’ll be looking at that figure today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Claptrap is the first deluxe offering from the Borderlands line, hitting shelves at the same time as the Zer0 figure, and thus loosely making up the second series of the line.  Most of McFarlane’s deluxe figure offerings are at a larger scale than standard releases, but this isn’t the case with Claptrap, who is meant to be in the same relative scale as the three prior figures.  The figure stands 4 1/2 inches tall and he has 15 points of articulation.  The majority of the articulation is in the arms, but he’s got a movable eye and a “lid” that goes up and down, which is a pretty nifty feature.  As far as scaling of this figure relative to the others, he seems a touch large for my eyes.  Like, not atrociously so, but he just looks a little off to me.  It *could* just be his accessories that are throwing me off.  His sculpt is an all-new one, and its a pretty solid offering.  The model from the game has been well captured here.  The details are clean, and the line work is sharp.  There’s some great work on the dings and weathering on his outer plating, which helps give him that nice broken-in look that fits in so well with the game aesthetic.  My one complaint about the sculpt is the pegs they’ve put on his top for his hats.  They’re not at all subtle, and break up an otherwise very  faithful sculpt.  I think it would have made more sense to put the pegs in the hats, since the holes would be less obvious.  The paintwork matches up with the sculpt, the base work is clean, and the accenting helps sell the sculpted details.  There’s a slight gash on my figure’s eye, which is a little annoying, but it’s minor, and I think it’s safe to say it’s not the norm.  Claptrap includes a stand, which uses an articulated arm to plug into his back.  He can’t stand without it (it’s just one of the troubles of translating this design) so it’s certainly appreciated.  He also includes a sherrif’s hat and revolver, and a wizard’s hat and two different wands.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Though I don’t dislike Claptrap as much as some of the fanbase, I still waited a bit on this one.  I ended up grabbing the last one at my local TRU, once they hit the 40% off level of their liquidation process.  He’s a pretty decent figure, but I’m not sure he’s really worth the heightened price.  It’ll be interesting to see how this concept works out for McFarlane.