Action Figures For The Questioning #006: Boxed Set

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

BOXED SET

BoxedSet

What is it?:

A collection of figures, typically based around a theme of some sort.  Generally refers to a number of figures greater than three.  It isn’t uncommon to see re-releases or a large amount of part re-use in such sets.  Frequently used to release lesser known characters, as packing them with better known characters means the average buyer will still buy them.

Action Figures For The Questioning #005: Bleed Over

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

BLEED OVER

BleedOver

What is it?:

A result of poor application of paint on a figure.  Bleed over is when paint goes past it’s intended stopping point.  It is usually evident by looking at sculpted boarders between colors, or possibly a painted line detailing a boarder.  Generally seen as making a figure look cheaply made.

Action Figures For The Questioning #004: Articulation

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

ARTICULATION

Articulation

What is it?:

Each point of movement on a figure is considered a point of articulation.  A figure with 20 points of articulation can move a different direction in 20 places.  Too much articulation can ruin the aesthetic of a figure.  Too little can limit the fun factor.  It is preferred that it not be too tight or too loose.

Example:

Movement in neck, shoulders and hips are the standard points of articulation.

Action Figures For The Questioning #003: Army Builder

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

ARMY BUILDER

ArmyBuilder

What is it?:

A figure, typically of a nameless character, that can serve as a generic member of an army of similar characters.  Army builders are meant to help you build an army at a greater speed, by letting the collector have a figure they can buy a large quantity of at once.  It is also beneficial to the toy company, as they get greater sales without having to tool new figures.

Example:

Storm Troopers or Clone Troopers.

Action Figures For the Questioning #002: Add-Ons

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

ADD-ON

add-on

What is it?:

Anything that is not part of a figure’s body sculpt or underlying structure. Usually made of a different material, often a rubbery material.  These pieces may or may not be removeable. Minimates and Buck System will cover common uses.

Example:

A coat, vest, or fringe pieces of bulkier clothing.

Action Figures For The Questioning # 001: Accessories

I’ve been in the action figure world for about 20 years.  So, it’s safe to say I’ve got a fair bit of knowledge on the terms that tend to be thrown around by collectors with little or no explanation as to what they mean.  I generally try to explain a concept on its first appearance on this site, but much as Stan Lee once said to assume every comic book was somebody’s first, I too must assume that every review on this site might be the first to be read by a new visitor.  As such, I’ve decided to put together a guide to some of the more frequently used terms and names that might show up.

ACCESSORIES

accessories

What Are They?:

Accessories are a more normal term to hear.  Simply put, an Accessory is anything included with the figure that isn’t actually part of the figure itself.  They can vary in number, but generally collectors prefer for there to be more.  Some toy companies will put in accessories that are made up, or make no sense for the character, such as large spring loaded missile launchers.

Example:

Luke Skywalker’s Light Saber, Batman’s Batarang, or even a simple gun for a character known to carry such things are good examples of an accessory, but they can also include pieces like interchangeable heads, extra hands, or scene specific pieces.