#3149: Inigo Montoya – Bloodied

INIGO MONTOYA — BLOODIED

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

Alright, just one more day with The Princess Bride.  Let’s make the most of it, shall we?  With variants for Westley and Buttercup already on the books, that just leaves Fezzik and Inigo.  Fezzik’s variant was just not enough for me to justify spending the extra $40 to get him, but I was able to get on board with the Inigo variant.  And, I’m gonna take a look at that variant today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Inigo Montoya (Bloodied) is the final figure in Series 2 of The Princess Bride line from McFarlane.  He joins Buttercup as the other figure based on the end of the film, though they are notably two characters that have no real interactions, especially at the end of the film.  He’s specifically based on Inigo’s injured appearance post final duel.  And, like Buttercup, Inigo’s natural counterpart, Count Rugen, isn’t likely to get made.  That said, he’s again another figure that does alright as a piece on his own.  The figure stands a little over 7 inches tall and he has 35 points of articulation.  Almost all of Inigo’s sculpt is a re-use from the Series 1 release, with only the head sculpt changing.  Inigo’s sculpt was the best of the Series 1 figures, and his appearance remains fairly similar throughout, so it’s a good re-use.  The new head trades out the more calm and composed expression from the first release for a more intense, teeth-gritting expression.  It fits the mid-battle look, and changes up his look enough to make him more noticeably different from the first release.  It’s a good sculpt, perhaps not as strong a likeness as the first one, but still with enough of a vibe of Mandy Patinkin to be recognizable.  Inigo’s paint work takes the set-up on the first figure, and adds the blood from his injuries.  They blood splatters actually match up with the injuries in the film pretty well, and the blood on the hand in particular looks pretty convincing.  Also, notably, the figure doesn’t have the side-eye, and that certainly is an improvement.  Inigo is packed with his sword (with additional blood smears) and a display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Inigo is definitely the least different of the variants in the main series, and I wasn’t sure that I was going to get him.  That said, in hand, I rather liked the look of him.  The blood effect is actually quite nicely handled, and it does more to change up the figure than you might expect.  The Series 1 figure is still going to be my go-to, but I certainly like this one more than I’d expected to.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3148: Princess Buttercup – Wedding Dress

PRINCESS BUTTERCUP — WEDDING DRESS

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

As we make our way through the rest of the second assortment of McFarlane’s Princess Bride line, we’re entirely dealing with the variants that make up the majority of the assortment.  Yesterday, I looked at one half of the story’s central pair of lovers, and today, I’m taking a look at the other.  The last Buttercup figure focused on the “Princess” half of the title, while this release focusses on the “Bride” half, depicting her from her wedding to Prince Humperdink at the film’s climax.  Seems like a sensible enough excuse for another variant of the character.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Princess Buttercup (Wedding Dress) is part of Series 2 of The Princess Bride line.  She’s one of two figures based on the film’s climax in the second assortment, though the two don’t, like, go together or anything, since there’s no Humperdink to go with her at this time.  Still, it’s a prominent look, and the one she’s wearing during their escape at the end, so even without the Humperdink to go with her, it makes a degree of sense.  The figure stands 6 3/4 inches tall and she has 35 points of articulation.  The sculpt on this figure has a number of parts in common with the Series 1 version of the character, though not really many of the visible parts.  The head is the same (though not the hair; that’s been modified to add the crown), as are the hands, and the legs and pelvis.  The head remains a respectable take on Robin Wright, and the new crown piece sits nicely on it.  The new upper torso captures most of the features of the dress from the movie, though some of the details seem a little bit iffy on exact accuracy.  The new feet are more or less the same as the prior versions, but with extra detailing at the top of the foot; not entirely sure that’s accurate, but it at least looks a bit different.  Like the last figure, the skirt piece is cloth; the pattern appears to be the same; it’s a solid fabric, and kind of stiff, making it rather far off from the dress in the movie.  But, I guess it gets the general idea across?  The color work on this figure is okay, with the paint on the face being pretty clean in particular.  She’s still got a bit of side-eye going on, but it’s a little more reserved this time, and not matched by the squinting, so it looks a little better.  The dress seems a little too blue to my eyes, but that might just be a lighting thing.  The paint work is at least pretty cleanly handled.  Buttercup is packed with only a display stand.  While there’s a shortage of things to pack with the standard Buttercup, the fact that this one doesn’t include the dagger from the scene after the wedding seems like a silly omission, especially given that she’s still got that gripping hand.  What’s its purpose otherwise?

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I was iffy on needing this figure initially, but wound up getting the whole series, and she came along with it.  It’s at least a fairly unique design, and, issues of accuracy aside, I do think she still makes for an alright figure.  The eyes being less ridiculous this time around certainly helps her, but it’s a shame she doesn’t really match up with the rest of the cast that we’ve gotten so far.  Still, on her own, she’s quite nice.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3147: Dread Pirate Roberts – Bloodied

DREAD PIRATE ROBERTS — BLOODIED

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

Yesterday, I kicked back into my Princess Bride reviews with the only new character in Series 2 of the line.  Today, I continue with the first of the three variant figures that make up the rest of the assortment.  I’m going to look at them from most notable variant to least notable variant.  Most notable it is, then!  Princess Buttercup’s love Westley initially resurfaces in her life as the masked mystery man, the Dread Pirate Roberts, but after rescuing her from Vizzini and his men, he reveals his identity, before taking a bit of a beating while trekking through the fire swamp, changing up his look bit for the rest of the movie…or at the very least removing the mystery of the initial look.  That’s the look that gets the figure today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

The Dread Pirate Roberts (Bloodied) is the second figure in Series 2 of McFarlane’s The Princess Bride line.  While I don’t like to harp on names on the box too much, the fact that this guy is still labeled “Dread Pirate Roberts,” despite being a post-unmasking version of the character, and thereby being pretty much exclusively Westley at that point, seems like an odd choice.  But, it’s hardly the oddest choice that ol’ Toddy boy has ever made.  The figure stands a little over 7 inches tall and he has 35 points of articulation.  As was expected for this release, a lot of his parts are shared with the Series 1 Roberts.  It’s a for better/for worse situation, since it’s consistent and all, but it’s also victim to the weird hang-ups of the original sculpt, especially that weird torso/pelvis set-up.  He gets a new head and left arm to sell his new look.  The head is a solid offering.  The likeness is even better than the masked version, and the hair is pretty much perfect for Elwes’ hair in the movie.  The new left arm showcases the damage to his shirt from fighting the Rodent-of-unusual-size, as well as the missing glove.  It’s a good change-up, marred by only one thing: they didn’t re-sculpt the right side, so he’s still got one glove, which is a look he never has in the movie.  Even just redoing the hand would at least sell it a bit better.  As it stands, it just feels a bit lazy.  Westley’s paint work is largely pretty similar to the standard version, but he’s got some blood on the shoulder, as well as more detailing on the face and the hair.  He seems rather pale for Westley, but honestly, it’s not the worst thing.  Westley is packed with his sword and a display stand, mirroring what came with the first release.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

The first Westley was the weakest of the first series.  This one had a bit more potential.  Ultimately, he probably could have just been an extra head and hands with the first release, especially given that they didn’t even fully commit to the dressed-down look, but at the same time, this one does work just a little bit better than the first one.  The unmasked look is more prevalent in the film, and works better as a figure, so he’s ultimately a slightly better offering, and just the better of the two, really.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3146: Vizzini

VIZZINI

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

Back nearer the beginning of the year, the first series of The Princess Bride figures from McFarlane Toys hit retail.  It covered the basics for the film’s cast, and was generally not as bad as it could have been, given that it was, you know, McFarlane, and all.  A follow-up was announced very shortly after the first, which includes variants on all of the first assortment’s characters, as well as one new addition.  I’m looking at said new addition, Wallace Shawn’s Vizzini, one of the film’s most inconceivably memorable characters, today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Vizzini is one of the four figures in Series 2 of The Princess Bride figures from McFarlane.  As noted above, he’s the only unique character from this assortment, and, going by how the line seems to be performing, he’s probably going to be the last unique character we’re going to see from the line.  The figure stands about 6 1/2 inches tall and he has 35 points of articulation.  His height means he’s a little shorter than the other figures, but he’s not enough shorter to accurately represent Wallace Shawn.  For accurate sizing, he should be almost an inch and a half shorter than the Inigo figure, when in reality he’s only a half an inch shorter.  It’s almost an inch off.  Flip side is that he happens to be in almost perfect scale with the Fezzik figure.  So, in a line-up with the three criminals, like in the movie when they first appear, it’s Inigo who winds up looking out of place.  But, you know, he’s the one that’s actually in proper scale…so it’s weird.  Scaling issues aside, the actual sculpt is pretty solid.  The likeness on the head is on par with the rest of the line, so it’s not spot-on, but it’s also close enough to be recognizable.  The expression is a good fit for the character, with that goofy grin and all.  The detailing on the outfit is pretty sharp, with a bunch of really great texturing.  The articulation scheme is a little less awkward looking here than on the rest of the line, which is certainly a plus.  The paint work on Vizzini is on par with the rest of the line.  The base work is all pretty cleanly handled.  We’re still getting the slightly odd grey smear for the five o’clock shadow, but it’s not quite as thick.  The eyes lose the side eye thing, so that’s a plus.  I also really dig how the accenting on his tunic turned out.  Vizzini is packed with two goblets and a display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

With the four figures we got out of Series 1, I wasn’t expecting a Series 2, to be honest.  In the back of my mind, I was hopeful for a Vizzini, so his inclusion in Series 2 is pretty awesome.  He’s a slightly better quality of figure than the Series 1 figures, so that’s actually quite nice.   And hey, they actually made a Wallace Shawn figure!  How cool is that?

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3070: Fezzik

FEZZIK

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

Providing the natural pair-off to Princess Bride’s dark and brooding Inigo, is the large, jovial, and friendly Fezzik.  Fezzik is the classic jolly giant, portrayed by a real-life jolly giant, Andre the Giant.  Did I say “giant” enough?  Though author William Goldman wrote the role of Fezzik specifically with Andre in mind, he was not the first actor cast in the role.  When the film first went into production, Andre was unavailable, so the role was initially given to a relatively unknown actor by the name of Arnold Schwarzenegger.  Production stalled, and by the time it picked back up, Schwarzenegger was, well, not so unknown, and Andre was available.  But there exists an alternate reality where The Princess Bride starred Arnold Schwarzenegger, and, by Last Action Hero rules, a corresponding reality where Fezzik was played by Sylvester Stallone.  Crazy, huh?  Also weird to acknowledge an example of us being in the objectively better reality.  How about that?

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Fezzik is a Megafig release from McFarlane’s The Princess Bride line, designed to correspond with the standard Series 1 figures.  For those of you playing at home, that means that McFarlane actually gave us the whole core cast in one shot.  No weird oddball choices or obviously missing characters.  Are…are they aloud to do that?  Well, I guess we’ll give it a try.  Fezzik stands 9 1/4 inches tall and he has 23 points of articulation.  Right off the bat, the biggest issue with this figure is…well, how big he is.  Andre the Giant was 7’4″ tall, which, given that Cary Elwes and Mandy Patinkin are both right about 6′ tall, that should make this figure about an inch shorter than he currently is.  Hey, nobody ever said McFarlane was any good at scale.  In fact, it’s usually the opposite.  It’s a shock the other three were as well balanced as they were.  Ultimately, Fezzik is noticeably larger than the rest of the cast, and so is this figure.  So, he should be smaller, but he’s not, and we’ll just have to make the best of it.  Speaking of “the best of it”, despite the larger than it should be stature, the sculpt on Fezzik is probably the strongest of the figures so far.  The detailing, especially the texturing on his clothing is really top notch, and the bulk of the body matches well with Andre’s real-life build.  The head sculpt isn’t a spot-on recreation of Andre’s likeness; the hair’s a little too tidy, and the face seems a touch elongated.  That said, it captures a lot of the important elements in terms of quick recognition, and I’m especially pleased that they’ve gone with a more jovial expression for the face, as that feels far more in keeping with Fezzik as a character.  The real down turn for this figure winds up being the paint work.  It’s not terrible, but there are some notable issues.  Like the rest of the series, he’s got the side-eye going on, which is annoying.  On top of that, he’s got some fairly heavy shading on the eyes, which makes him look a bit like a racoon, as well as on the lower face.  Andre was fairly clean shaven in the film, and didn’t have any odd shading on his eyes, so the choice to do this extra shading, especially coupled with his general skin color feeling a bit paler than it should, makes him look a little spooky and sickly, which I don’t think is the intent.  Fezzik is packed with a rock (specifically the one meant to be thrown at Westley’s head), a peanut, and a display stand.  So, umm, about the peanut?  Yeah, Fezzik never actually has one.  Nor does anyone, at any point in the film.  This is a no-peanuts film.  It’s obviously a reference to Fezzik’s “Anybody want a peanut?” line, during the rhyming sequence.  But, the thing is, he doesn’t actually have one, and he’s actually just using the question to annoy Vizzini.  It’s a great scene, but, well, again, there’s no actual peanut.  Also, this peanut is, like, three times the size it should be, and looks downright ridiculous.  Why is it here?  Mostly to justify pushing the cloak off to a second release, which honestly feels rather weak.  I’d have much rather had the cloak.  I mean, what am I gonna do with this on the shelf?

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

There was no way I was going to miss out on completing this particular set, and the Fezzik was included right from the get-go, with no weirdness surrounding likeness or anything, was a definite plus on getting me on-board for the whole thing.  Inigo’s my favorite, and the strongest of the set, but I think Fezzik’s a pretty strong second.  There are still some definite issues with the final release (it wouldn’t be a true McFarlane release if their weren’t), but ultimately, the good of the figure shines through them.  All-in-all, it’s a stronger set of figures than it has any right to be, and at this point, I’m just happy to have them.  I’m on board for more and will be picking up (most of) Series 2, but if the line stopped right here, I’d still be pretty happy.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.

#3069: Inigo Montoya

INIGO MONTOYA

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (MCFARLANE TOYS)

While Buttercup and Westley are likable protagonists whom the story is undoubtedly centered upon, the success of The Princess Bride really lies with its supporting players, and their own respective journeys.  Perhaps the film’s most satisfying journey is that of Inigo Montoya (of “Hello my name is” fame), who begins the film as just a hired sword, albeit a terribly likable one, and finishes the story by tracking down the man who killed his father and finally gaining the vengeance he had been hunting for two decades, only to discover that vengeance is ultimately rather hollow.  It’s a powerful and impactful story, with a lot of weight to it for something that’s ostensibly a comedy.  And now he’s got an action figure, which I’m gonna take a look at today.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Inigo Montoya is the third and final figure in the first standard assortment of McFarlane’s The Princess Bride line.  Inigo’s only got the one look in the film, but it does sort of evolve in how disheveled he appears.  This figure’s rather on the cleaner side, signifying he’s from earlier in the film’s run time.  The figure stands a little over 7 inches tall and he has 35 points of articulation.  His articulation is really just the standard McFarlane fare.  It works decently with the sculpt, and manages to not break up the sculpt too badly.  His sculpt is all-new, but as with the others in the first set, most of his sculpt will see re-use on his Series 2 counterpart.  It’s honestly a pretty solid offering.  The proportions are slightly lanky, but not nearly as gangly and awkward as Westley’s were, and the general fit together is much better.  The leg articulation works in a bit oddly, but it’s again better than Westley.  The detailing on the outfit is definitely impressive; they’ve done quite a nice job of replicating Inigo’s very worn-in attire.  The head’s got a passable likeness of Mandy Patinkin; it’s a bit caricature, but it’s fairly easily recognized.  The more dour expression certainly works here, and they’ve even remembered to include the scars on his cheeks.  The hair is a little thick and un-hair-like, but it gets the proper shaping, which certainly is the most important thing.  Inigo’s paint work is honestly the best of the bunch.  It’s still rather basic, but there’s enough detailing to make it work.  Curiously, despite Inigo generally being scruffier than Westley, this figure doesn’t get stuck with the heavy shadowing on the lower half of the face, or any scruff at all, actually.  I think it works in his favor, and the rest of the face detailing is pretty solid.  I like the slight shading under his eyes.  The two things I don’t like are the fact that the shoulder cups are molded in flesh tone, revealing the clashing color scheme when he’s posed, and, as with all of the figures, the dreaded side-eye.  As with Westley, he’s looking the opposite direction of his sword hand, and, just like Westley, this further emphasizes the general stupidness of not including alternate left hands for these two.  He does include his rather ornate sword, as well as a display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

If the very in depth introduction wasn’t an indicator, Inigo is and has always been my favorite character in The Princess Bride.  His figure was the one I was most looking forward to out of this bunch, and, in hand, I think he’s also the most impressive figure in the bunch.  Apart from the eyes thing and the lack of extra hand, this figure is a lot less hampered by issues than the others, making him genuinely just a pretty solid figure.  I definitely dig this one.

Thanks to my sponsors over at All Time Toys for setting me up with this figure to review.  If you’re looking for cool toys both old and new, please check out their website.