#0079: Ultraman Taro

ULTRAMAN TARO

ULTRA-ACT

Image

Today marks Day 1 of my post-Christmas Review, where I’ll do reviews of all the figures I received this year as gifts during the holiday season.  Up first is my second review in the Ultra-Act line.  Last time I looked at the original Ultraman, this time I’ll be looking at Ultraman Taro, the fifth incarnation of Ultraman.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Taro here was released as part of the 2013 series of the Ultra-Act line.  This is the character’s first release in the line.  He’s based on the character’s appearance in his series Ultraman Taro, which ran from 1973 to 1974.  As far as I know, Taro only had one look, and this is it, so I suppose it’s the logical choice.  Taro stands just a hair over 6 inches tall, making him about the same height as the first Ultraman.  He’s also got the same 40 points of articulation as the previous figure.  The joints are a bit tighter on this figure, which I prefer a bit more.  The figure’s sculpt looks fairly accurate to the character’s look on the show, though it does appear that Bandai has given him a slightly more “heroic” build than the stunt man in the original suit had.  This is fine by me, as it helps to keep the older Ultras in a similar style to the more modern ones, and quite frankly, makes for a more impressive figure.  Taro’s design is a bit more detailed than the original Ultraman’s, and they’ve pulled off those details convincingly.  There’s some great work on the hands and feet showing all the seams and wrinkles present in the boots and gloves.  The paint here’s not quite as good as it was on the original Ultraman, in my opinion, but it’s still very well done.  My only real issue is that the green gem on his forehead is a tiny bit sloppy.  It’s forgivable, given the scale they’re working at, but I wish it were just a smidge better.  Like the last Ultraman, Taro’s got a wide array of accessories.  He includes an alternate red color timer, a plug to allow him to be connected to one of the figarts stands, his lance, his king bracelet at full expanded size, three interchangeable left glove cuffs, an alternate shoulder piece and 10 pairs of hands:  fisted (L and R), karate chop (L and R), action gesture (L and R), a hand to hold the king bracelet (R), a hand to hold the lance (R), a hand with a beam attached (L), and a wide splayed hand (R).  The color timer is a standard for the line.  It’s the same as the normal one, just red.  The plug for the stand is only of use if you’ve buy one of their stands, which I haven’t.  The lance and the king bracelet are nicely done, and fit well into the appropriate hands.  The glove cuffs allow you to display Taro with his bracelet in various states.  The Shoulder piece is a clever idea.  It’s bent on the right side to allow the figure’s right shoulder to be placed in more deep stances.   The hands all look great and swap out with ease, and add a lot of play value to the figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Taro was a Christmas gift from my parents this year.  I’ve been wanting one for a while, and my parents got a hold of one for me for the holiday.  I was quite excited to get this guy, as he’s one of the more unique looking Ultramen, and really looks cool in the display.  Thanks Mom and Dad!

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4 responses

  1. I have always liked the more unique looking Ultramen of the 70s: Ace, Taro, and Leo. Somehow, Taro has become my favorite Ultraman in recent years, though I’ve never watched his show (or at least found english subtitles to understand it.)

    I like the idea of the second harness piece for posing but I had a little trouble with fitting the color timer and the harness onto the figure’s chest. It was probably something I was doing wrong, and no fault of the figure. It’s a really great figure.

    • Yeah, the more unique ones are really cool! I actually have Leo on the way, so I hope to review him when he gets here.
      The color timers are cool in theory, but yeah, they can be difficult to fit properly.

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