#1995: Captain Marvel – Starforce

CAPTAIN MARVEL — STAR FORCE

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

Using her intensive training from her days in the Air Force, Carol Danvers boldly leads an intergalactic fleet as Captain Marvel.”

Well, I gave one MCU-based Captain their due.  Why not jump on over to another?  Captain Marvel continues to perform very well at the box office, and will, without a doubt, follow in Black Panther’s footsteps, remaining in theaters even as its MCU successor Endgame arrives.  I looked at the movie’s main assortment of Marvel Legends right before the film hit theaters, but there was one figure I hadn’t managed to snag yet at that time, a variant of the main character that I’ll be taking a look at today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Starforce Captain Marvel is a Target-exclusive Legends release.  She was impeccably timed, showing up at most stores within a week before or after the film’s release.  She was also a successful step forward in Target getting their exclusives up on their webstore, meaning she’s been a reasonably easy experience for most of the fans that wanted one.  As the name denotes, she’s based on Carol’s Starforce colors from the film.  The figure is a rather logical repaint of the standard Captain Marvel figure, meaning she stands the same height and has the same articulation.  While the sculpt is not a 100% perfect replica of her look from the movie, it’s still a good, solid offering, and its reuse here is kind of expected.  It’s decked out in a new color scheme, and, I have to say, I think this color set does the sculpt a lot of favors.  Obviously I’m not knocking her usual colors, but there’s something about this look that feels more dynamic and has more of a pop to it.  It makes the figure look pretty sufficiently different from the main release.  Carol gets the same masked/unmasked head selection as the standard release.  The helmeted head is understandably different, so as to match her uniform.  The unmasked head is also different, but in a much subtler, more than likely unintentional sense.  It still doesn’t look a whole lot like Brie Larson, but I’m warming up to it.  Following a trend that Hasbro’s been really getting into lately, this Carol figure isn’t *just* a Carol figure.  She also gets an extra head, hands, scarf, and rifle, allowing her to be turned into fellow Starforce member Minn-Erva.  Minn-Erva played a decently-sized role in the film, so it’s certainly nice to see her crop up, and it’s also a fantastic way of getting us an extra character out a necessary variant of the main character.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

After rather easily acquiring the main assortment through All Time Toys, this figure was slightly more illusive (though mostly because I resisted doing the easier thing of just ordering one online), but I was able to find her within a week of seeing the movie.  I’m glad I did, because I really liked the Starforce design (probably owing a lot to my history as a Green Lantern fan), and it especially translates well to toy form.  Not only is the standard Carol figure really cool, but the ability to turn her into Minn-Erva makes this an essential part of the collection.  Hopefully she continues to be easy to acquire.

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#1988: Yon-Rogg & Phil Coulson

YON-ROGG & PHIL COULSON

MARVEL MINIMATES

Hey, do you guys remember yesterday’s whacky pairing of two guys from Captain Marvel that never meet?  Well then you’ll love today’s pairing of two other guys from Captain Marvel that also never meet.  Though, I guess in a slight uptick of connectivity, at least these two do occupy the same planet at the same time, which is more than yesterday’s pair.  Maybe they formed a budding relationship off-screen!  Well, let’s look at best buds Yon-Rogg and Phil Coulson.  Nope, that feels wrong.  I don’t think these guys are friends.  Let’s look at mortal enemies Yon-Rogg and Phil Coulson.  There, that feels better.

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Yon-Rogg and Coulson are the last of the Walgreens-exclusive Marvel Minimates for the Captain Marvel assortment.  There’s also going to be a specialty-exclusive boxed set, but these are it for now.

YON-ROGG

Man, we were really itching to find out what Yon-Rogg’s big secret was before the movie came out.  Turns out the big secret was that there was really no big secret, aside perhaps from this version of Yon-Rogg somehow ending up as less villainous than his comics counterpart.  Honestly, though, it feels like they came up with the role for Law without knowing exactly which Kree officer he’d be playing, and eventually decided to tag him with Yon-Rogg’s name (the fact that said name is only spoken once in the film, said in a scene where his character isn’t even present kind of lends credence to this).  Whatever the case, he’s a pretty prominent character, and obviously he was going to show up somewhere in this line.  He makes use of add-on pieces for his hair, backpack, gloves, belt, and holster.  The hair is reused from Venkman, but otherwise these pieces are new.  At first glance, the holster looks the same as Korath’s, but it’s actually its mirror piece, correctly representing their placement in the film.  Like Carol, Yon-Rogg also includes an alternate helmet piece, should you want him fully armed up.  But, given how briefly he wears it in the movie, I don’t see it getting much use from me.  Yon-Rogg’s paint is pretty involved, and matches up with Carol and Bron-Charr (but not with Korath and Ronan). The face has a pretty solid likeness of Jude Law, which is certainly refreshing after the Legends figure.  Yon-Rogg is packed with a pistol, an effect piece for his weird gauntlet thing, and a clear display stand.

PHIL COULSON

Though relatively minor in the film, Coulson’s return to the MCU proper was still a delightful one, and Clark Gregg was clearly having a blast playing the rookie field agent version of the character.  His presence in this assortment is no doubt due to the large fanbase for the character.  He’s not new to Minimates, with an MCU release back in Series 39 for the first Thor film (reviewed here), plus animated and comics versions of the character.  That said, it’s nice to get another go at him, if for nothing else than to pair off with Fury.  Coulson is pretty much the same as Fury in terms of construction, just swapping out the hairpiece for a new one, representing Coulson’s ’90s hair.  Of course, it’s nondescript enough to work for a modern Coulson as well, if that’s what you’re looking for.  Coulson’s paintwork is respectable.  I think the facial likeness is better than prior attempts, and I especially like the different pattern on the tie.  Like Fury, Coulson is packed with a spare set of white arms, a handgun, a shoulder holster, and a clear display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Though they don’t offer much new after looking at all of the other figures in this line-up, I do find myself quite liking this pair.  It’s nice to get a Yon-Rogg figure that isn’t horribly disappointing, and I’ve been hoping for a Coulson update since The Avengers came out.  All in all, a nice pair to round out a pretty fun little assortment.  I look forward to the boxed set.

#1987: Nick Fury & Ronan

NICK FURY & RONAN

MARVEL MINIMATES

When it comes to Minimates, specifically the two-pack driven lines, there are bound to be some slightly oddball pairings.  The prior two sets for Captain Marvel made a lot of sense.  Today’s set?  Well, the two characters contained within it not only never meet, there never even on the same planet at the same time.  And yet, here we are.

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Nick Fury and Ronan are the third set in the Walgreens-exclusive assortment of Captain Marvel-themed Marvel Minimates.  It’s worth noting that both characters in this set have had MCU-based ‘mates before, for what it’s worth.

NICK FURY

Though his name may not be in the title, Nick Fury is still an undisputed star in Captain Marvel, with his largest MCU role to date.  We get to see quite a different side of the character, and start to see where the Fury we met back in Iron Man came from.  Like the Legends release, this figure goes for his men-in-black style suit, which, while not his main look for the movie, is a fairly distinctive one.  The figure makes use of three add-on pieces for the hair, jacket, and tie.  All three are re-used from many prior figures.  They’re pretty basic, but then, so was his look.  The rest of the work is handled via paint.  My figure has one major flaw; a splotch of missing paint on his cheek.  Apart from that, I guess things are pretty decent.  The face doesn’t have much of a likeness of SLJ, but it doesn’t look unlike him.  I do particularly like the pattern on the tie.  That’s a fun touch.  Fury is packed with a handgun, a spare set of white arms, a shoulder holster, and a clear display stand.

RONAN

Unlike Fury, the movie doesn’t really give us any more backstory on Ronan prior to our introduction to him Guardians.  Pretty much, Ronan’s still just kind of Ronan, for better or for worse.  On the plus side, the film uses Ronan’s affiliation with the Kree Empire to give him his more traditional color scheme from the comics.  The figure uses two add-on pieces: one for his head piece, and one for his skirt.  They’re the same pieces used for the prior MCU Ronan figure, which is sensible enough, since, design wise, they’re pretty much the same.  The new paint job is a lot greener, as expected of this variation of the design.  Like yesterday’s Korath figure, Ronan’s green isn’t metallic like the first two Kree uniforms were.  Of course, since Ronan’s from a different group, I guess it’s not quite as odd for him.  Beyond that, there’s a lot of nice detailing going on.  Ronan is packed with his signature hammer (with it’s head on the proper way this time) and a clear display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I got this pair at the same time as the rest of the assortment.  Nick’s an important player, and the two distinct looks help him.  Ronan may be a much more minor character in the film, but he’s a nice, distinctive design, with a lot more pop than his prior Guardians release.

#1986: Starforce Captain Marvel & Korath

STARFORCE CAPTAIN MARVEL & KORATH

MARVEL MINIMATES

Despite its ’90s setting, Captain Marvel had quite a good number of returning (or, from a certain perspective, debuting) characters, who were a sizable part of not only the marketing, but also the merchandising.  It also followed the MCU trend of multiple distinct looks for its main character.  Both of those two things will be touched on in today’s review.

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Starforce Captain Marvel and Korath are the second set of Walgreens-exclusive Captain Marvel Marvel Minimates.  All of the sets in this line-up feature at least one Starforce uniform, but this one goes nuts and gives us two.  I know.  Crazy.

STARFORCE CAPTAIN MARVEL

In a nice little throwback to Mar-Vell’s original colors, Carol begins the movie in green.  She also bears a slight resemblance to another comics company’s former test-pilot turned super-powered space cop, but I’m sure that’s just a total coincidence, right?  Would you believe this is the first time we’ve gotten any version of Captain Marvel in green?  That seems a little bit wacky to me.  Construction-wise, this figure is exactly the same as yesterday’s standard colored Captain Marvel.  She’s got the same basic hair, and swaps out for the same helmet piece as before.  The main difference is the paint, which is swapped for green and black and gives her a different facial expression.  I’m not crazy about the facial expression’s look when unmasked, but it ends up working out a lot better when the helmet is in place, so I find it to be a worthy trade-off.  Starforce Carol again mimics the standard figure for its accessories, meaning she includes a flight stand and a standard clear display stand.

KORATH

“WHOOOO!?!” …You see, it’s funny, because it’s Korath…the guy…the guy who say’s “WHOOOO!?” to Star-Lord at the beginning of the first Guardians….and now I’m applying it to him?  Get it?  I assure you, it’s very funny.  I’ve got this certificate that says so.  Where was I?  Australia!  No!  Korath!  That’s the one.  Though the Guardians ‘mates went pretty deep with their coverage, Korath was perhaps the one notable character to be left out.  Fortunately he got a second chance!  The figure’s almost a vanilla ‘mate; his only add-on is his holster for his sidearm.  Beyond that, he’s carried out via paint, which is decent enough.  The likeness is pretty spot-on, which is really the most important part, since I suspect a number of collectors will be sticking it on another body for a Guardians Korath.  The body’s okay, but not great.  The details just don’t seem to be quite as sharp on Korath as they are on the other two Starforce members, and the green appears to be a slightly different shade for some reason.  Korath is packed with a pistol and a pair of swords, as well as a clear display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Like yesterday’s pair, I grabbed these two a little while before the movie’s release, but didn’t actually open them until the night I saw it in the theatre.  I wasn’t sure what to think of another Marvel, but I really dig the Starforce colors for her.  Korath’s not perfect, but it’s at the very least nice to finally have him, even if it is a slightly different version of him.

#1985: Captain Marvel & Bron-Char

CAPTAIN MARVEL & BRON-CHAR

MARVEL MINIMATES

“Ace Air Force pilot Carol Danvers becomes one of the universe’s most powerful heroes when Earth is caught in the middle of a galactic war between two alien races.  Set in the 1990s, Marvel’s Captain Marvel is an all-new adventure from a previously unseen period of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.”

“Marvel’s Captain Marvel” does seem a touch redundant, don’t you think?  I mean, for the general public, at least.  I suppose there was a time there was some genuine confusion, but DC’s pretty firmly on that “Shazam” train.  So, while we’re on the topic of “Marvel’s Captain Marvel,” the movie sure is doing well at the box office, topping even DC’s own female-led Wonder Woman.  That’s pretty cool.  I’ve looked at most of the Legends from the movie, but this week I’ll be looking at the other major offerings, courtesy of DST’s Minimates brand.  I’ll be starting things off with the good Captain herself, as well as fellow Starforce member Bron-Char.

THE FIGURES THEMSELVES

Captain Marvel and Bron-Char are the first of four Walgreens-exclusive Marvel Minimates released to tie-in with the film.  Unlike prior films, there are no shared figures between these sets and the specialty boxed set, so these two are totally unique.

CAPTAIN MARVEL

Seen here in her main colors from the end of the film, this is the definitive Captain Marvel release for the set.  Amazingly, this is only Carol’s third Minimate, and her second under the title of Captain Marvel.  The figure’s built on the standard body, so she’s 2 1/4 inches tall and has 14 points of articulation.  She’s got an add-on for her hair, which appears to be a new piece.  It’s a respectable match for her hairstyle from the movie.  It’s a little restricting on the articulation side, but it’s hardly the worst.  She’s also got an alternate helmeted piece, which is another new part.  It’s accurate to the film, and cleanly sculpted, but it doesn’t quite line-up so well with the face on this one.  The paint on this figure’s not bad.  I definitely dig the metallics, though some of the basic applications are a little sloppy around the edges.  The helmet probably gets the worst overall work; in addition to not really lining up with the face, it’s also got a really wonky misprint on the eyes, so make sure to keep an eye on that.  In addition to the helmet, Carol is also packed with a flight stand and a clear display stand.

BRON-CHAR

A slightly more minor character in the film, Bron-Char’s the Starforce’s resident bruiser.  He’s actually a decent choice to partner off with the main colors Captain Marvel, since they do have a notable fight scene in the film.  He’s a bigger guy, so he makes use of add-ons for his torso, belt, and gauntlets.  The torso and belt are standard parts; the torso isn’t one of my favorites, and doesn’t really work so well without any add-ons are the arms and legs.  The gauntlets are new, and nice enough pieces.  There’s no hair piece, which I kind of think might have been a mistake.  At the very least, one of the sculpted beard pieces would have added something to him.  The paintwork is pretty respectable.  There’s a lot of detailing and it’s all pretty sharp.  Bron-Char’s only accessory is a clear display stand.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I found this whole assortment of ‘mates at Walgreens a couple of weeks before the movie’s release.  I ended up letting them sit until the day I went to see the movie, so I was able to come home that night from the movie and open them up, which was pretty fun.  Basic Carol is a good basic Carol.  Fairly straightforward, but good nonetheless.  Bron-Char’s cool to see crop up, since it’s not like we’re really going to see him anywhere else.

#1970: Kree Sentry

KREE SENTRY

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

Mar-Vell’s appearance in late 1967 was not our first taste of the Kree empire.  In fact, our first run-in with them was several months earlier year, when the Fantastic Four faced off against Sentry 459, a deactivated Sentry stationed on Earth.  Its defeat by the team would signal Ronan the Accuser, and bring the entire Kree empire into play.  But it all started with this big, hulking purple and blue robot.  So, what better Build-A-Figure for Kree-centric series of Marvel Legends than said big, hulking, purple and blue robot?

THE FIGURE ITSELF

The Kree Sentry is, unsurprisingly, the build-a-figure for the Kree Sentry Series of Marvel Legends.  This marks the Sentry’s first foray into the world of Legends figures, though it’s the second figure overall, following a Minimate release back in 2012.  The figure stands 8 inches tall and he has 29 points of articulation.  The Sentry is an all-new sculpt, which isn’t a huge shock.  It’s definitely a more modernized take on the Sentry, which, if I’m honest, wouldn’t be my first choice.  I’d really dig a more Kirby-inspired sculpt, but this one hits all of the broad strokes, I suppose.  If nothing else, this one was probably a little easier for Hasbro to articulate, as well as being slightly more balanced in size from piece to piece, thereby making him a little easier to break up amongst the single-release figures in this assortment.  The design on this guy kind of makes me wonder what other figures this guy might possibly be re-used for; I’m guessing Hasbro has *something* in mind.  Anyway, it’s a fairly decent, if perhaps slightly goofy, offering.  His paintwork, or color work as it mostly may be, is fairly eye-catching.  The metallic purple and blue is a nice look.  The only actual paint is on the head, which is nice enough, as it matches with the rest of the look.  The Sentry includes no accessories, but he’s an accessory himself, so that seems fair.  Also, I’m not really sure what else you could have given him, anyway.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

The Kree Sentry’s a rather classic design, and one that hasn’t gotten much toy love.  When this guy was shown off as the Build-A-Figure for this set, I was definitely interested, though, like a lot of the figures in this line-up, I can’t say I *needed* him.  While I would have preferred a more classic take on the character, and I also wouldn’t have minded a slightly larger figure, I’m overall pretty happy with this goofy guy.

This assortment is kind of a middling one for me.  I like the Bomber Jacket Captain Marvel a lot, and I was rather let-down by the Yon-Rogg figure, but the rest of the figures fall firmly into the Journeyman category.  They certainly aren’t bad, but none of them are quite going to break any records.  Still, it’s not a bad set, especially for fans of the movie.  If you’re interested in getting a set of your own, all seven of the single figures are still in-stock at All Time Toys’ webstore.  And, as always, if you’re looking for other toys both old and new, please check out All Time’s website and their eBay storefront.

#1969: Genis-Vell

GENIS-VELL

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

Born of a Titanian Eternal, Genis-Vell possesses indomitable strength and uses powerful Nega-Bands to channel incredible energy blasts!”

Marvel has a thing for legacy, and the mantle of Captain Marvel is perhaps one of the most premiere examples of this.  Amusingly enough, the third person to hold the title, Genis-Vell, began his career actually named “Legacy.”  Genis was an interesting exploration of the whole concept, biologically the son of Mar-Vell, but created through engineering, rather than the old-fashioned way.  After inheriting the title in the ’90s, Genis was front and center for a little while, but by the mid-00s, he’d kind of fallen out of fashion again, and was ultimately dispatched by Baron Zemo in Thunderbolts.  Oh how the mighty had fallen.  But, with the Captain Marvel name getting a boost, it seems poor Genis has not been totally forgotten, and he’s received some Legends treatment, courtesy of Hasbro!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Genis-Vell is figure 6 in the Kree Sentry Series of Marvel Legends.  He is the second of the two comic-based figures in the set, but hey, at least he’s actually Captain Marvel-themed…what with being Captain Marvel and all.  Of course, he’s just titled “Genis-Vell” with no mention of holding the title, likely to avoid any brand confusion for people just coming in to the character with the movie.  The figure stands 6 1/2 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  Genis is seen here in his Kree-inspired get-up from the second half of his solo run.  It’s a cool design.  Not *my* personal choice, as I’m partial to his Mar-Vell-inspired costume, but that one was already released by Toy Biz back in the day, so I can understand Hasbro wanting to do something different.  Of course, it does mean that with this figure and Yon-Rogg, we ended up with two kind of similar looking figures in the set, but that was sort of inevitable no matter which way you took him.  The figure is built on the Reaper body (just like Grey Gargoyle, meaning both comic figures in this set are on the same base body), with a new head, shoulder-pads, shoulder strap, holster, and Nega-Bands. The new parts are decent enough.  The head sits a little high on the neck, but with the helmet it’s not super noticeable.  I foresee those Nega-Bands turning up again in the future, especially if Hasbro wants to give us a Mar-Vell update at some point.  Genis’s paintwork is actually a lot like Grey Gargoyle’s, in that the coolest bits aren’t actually painted.  The starfield effect is achieved through flecks of metallic plastic being molded throughout, and it looks quite nice, especially when lit.  The metallic green they’ve gone with is a shade on the dark side, which does mean it blends in a bit with the black of the body.  I think the figure would be a little more striking with a brighter green, allowing those details to stand out a little more.  Of course, the green sections not standing out is kind of a common issue for this design, even in 2D.  Genis is packed with a small gold blaster, as well as the Kree Sentry’s left leg.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

I never much followed Genis in his solo exploits, but I liked him in Avengers Forever, so I was definitely hoping to see him show up here.  Of course, this costume wouldn’t have been my first choice (like I said, I never followed his solo exploits), but it makes for a decent toy, I suppose.  Like Gargoyle, this figure is well-executed and a solid addition to the line-up.  That said, I’m still pulling for a pre-crazy Genis at some point.  In the mean time, this one will have to keep my Songbird company.

Genis hails from my friends at All Time Toys.  He’s actually the one figure in the set that they’re currently sold out of, but they still have all the rest.  And, if you’re looking for other toys both old and new, please check out their website and their eBay storefront.

#1967: Yon-Rogg

YON-ROGG

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Leader of the Star Force team, Yon-Rogg is a hero among the Kree and a key asset to the Supreme Intelligence in the war against the Skrulls.”

The number on today’s review could either be very clever, or only marginally related to the contents, depending on how things play out in Captain Marvel.  You see, in December of 1967, we got the first appearance of Kree Captain Mar-Vell, the original Captain Marvel (at least as far as Marvel Comics is concerned.)  What does that have to do with today’s subject, apart from being from the movie of the same title?  Well, nothing as it stands currently, but a lot when the movie’s cast was still being announced.  When Jude Law was cast in the film, it was announced he would be playing Dr. Walter Lawson, the Earth-based secret identity of Mar-Vell.  Law’s blonde-haired-blued-eyed appearance as, well as typically playing heroic roles made him seem to be a natural choice for Mar-Vell.  However, when the trailers hit, and interviews started, and merchandise started being solicited, all of the sudden, Law’s character was the unnamed “Star Force Commander,” with his identity being kept top-secret.  Then, at the begging of February, after a month or two of rumors, Law was confirmed as Yon-Rogg, by this figure, the Minimate, and the Pop.  Despite all of that, there’s still a good deal of confusion about the exact nature of Law’s character, and why the secretive Vell/Rogg switch occurred.  I guess we’ll know more in a matter of hours.

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Yon-Rogg is numbered figure 4 in the Kree Sentry Series of Marvel Legends.  He’s the final film-based figure in the line-up.  The figure stands 6 1/4 inches tall and he has 32 points of articulation.  Yon-Rogg is sporting an all-new sculpt, which is…a bit of a mixed bag, really.  Right off the bat, we’re dealing with the fact that this figure is supposed to based on Jude Law’s character, but you wouldn’t really know that by looking at him.  His head is wearing a helmet, which have yet to see Law actually wearing in any of the promotional stuff.  I’m sure he’s going to where it at some point in the film, but it’s clearly not his main appearance.  What’s more, what we can see of his face seems a good deal more generic than a proper Law likeness would be.  The whole head seems a little large when sitting on the rest of the body.  Of course, it’s nothing compared to his feet.  Those things are truly huge, and don’t appear to be remotely in scale with the rest of the figure.  Were they worried he was going to have stability issues?  He’s also got these weirdly large and flat sections of armor on his forearms, which don’t seem to match with the film appearance, and just generally make him feel rather awkward while posing.  Just in general, this is a rather odd looking figure.  I guess the paintwork is a little better; the metallic green certainly looks cool, and it contrasts all right with the black and silver.  There are still a few off spots, where sculpted details are left totally unpainted, but compared to the sculpt, it’s kind of a breath of fresh air.  So, obviously, there’s no extra head for Yon-Rogg, but he does get a small blaster pistol, as well as the torso of the Kree Sentry.  Not a super impressive selection by any stretch, but at this point, I’ve already written the figure off.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

Yon-Rogg is a figure I wanted to like.  I’m a sucker for the Kree Soldier look, and when he was originally shown, there was some belief that this might have just been an army builder.  I’d like to say he’d be better that way, but I really can’t.  There are just a lot of flaws to this figure, which hold him back from being as good as he could.  Maybe we’ll get a more proper Yon-Rogg in a two-pack or something.

#1966: Captain Marvel

CAPTAIN MARVEL

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Accompanied by her furry sidekick, Goose, Captain Marvel suits up to defend the universe from intergalactic threats.”

It’s becoming increasingly commonplace for movie-themed assortments of Marvel Legends to include multiple versions of the film’s main character, so it’s probably not a huge surprise that the Captain Marvel assortment would have two different Carols in play.  The first figure, which I covered on Sunday, was a more all-purpose variant.  Today’s figure is a little more specific, and is honestly a fun little throwback to the time period that’s the film’s setting.  Yes, Captain Marvel is a period piece, set in the ’90s, so it’s only right that she would follow the overwhelming trend of that decade’s super heroes by throwing a leather jacket over her costume!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Captain Marvel is numbered figure 3 in the line-up for the Kree Sentry Series of Marvel Legends, and she’s second of the two Marvels in the assortment.  The leather jacketed look didn’t initially seem like it will be her main look for the movie, but it’s quick and forced appearance in all of the merchandise indicates it may play a larger role than we may have initially guessed.  The figure stands 6 inches tall and has 27 points of articulation.  As you might expect, she shares a few parts with her standard counterpart, specifically, the torso, pelvis and legs.  While not perfect pieces, they were decent enough the first time around, and they remain decent here.  She gets a new head and arms, as well as a jacket add-on piece.  This head is superior to the prior one; the hair is slightly differently styled, being shorter and more dynamic, which improves both appearance and posability.  The face is also sporting a better likeness of Brie Larson, with a slightly more expressive look about it, and just a generally more defined set of features.  It also bears an uncanny likeness to Amy Poehler, who I’m just now realizing Brie Larson herself bears quite a resemblance.  The new jacketed parts are also pretty solid pieces as well, and mask the overall skinniness of the original sculpt a bit, making for a better overall look.  She’s also got a new set of hands, which aren’t a match for either pair included with the other figure.  They’re in a more relaxed state, which is fairly multi-purpose, and they look pretty decent, so that works out alright.  Carol’s paintwork is perhaps the most impressive in this assortment. The uniform matches the prior figure, albeit with her neck now flesh-toned instead of blue, to indicate her more relaxed look.  The face again uses the printed styling, and, apart from an errant mark on her forehead, it’s a nicer looking application then the other unmasked Carol’s.  Perhaps the coolest detail on the figure is the insignia printed on the back of her jacket, which even includes realistic wear, as though it were on a real leather jacket.  Captain Marvel is packed with two accessories.  The first is her pet cat Goose, seen here in a far less compromising state than the version included with Fury.  The second is the left arm of the Kree Sentry Build-A-Figure.  I will admit, she definitely feels a bit on the light side.  At the very least, an extra pair of hands would have been a nice addition, especially since they already had them sculpted for the main figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

As goofy as they may have been in the ’90s, I have to admit I’m kind of a sucker for the bomber jacket over spandex look, so it rather quickly jumped out at me when the Captain Marvel promotional materials started coming out.  I was quite pleased when this figure was confirmed as part of the main line-up, and I had definitely ear-marked it as my go-to Captain Marvel from the movie.  I wish she had the extra hands, but I can swap those out from the other figure easily enough.  She’s the superior of the two Captain Marvels available here, and honestly she’s probably my favorite of the figures I’ve looked at so far.

This Captain Marvel, like the first one, was purchased from my friends at All Time Toys, and she’s still available here.  And, if you’re looking for other toys both old and new, please check out their website and their eBay storefront.

#1965: Talos

TALOS

MARVEL LEGENDS (HASBRO)

“Talos, perhaps the most cunning spy in all of the Skrull Empire, is a master of shape-shifting and international espionage.  An integral leader in the bitter Kree-Skrull war, the fearsome Talos will do whatever it takes to protect his own.”

Back in late 2011/early 2012, when we were eagerly trying to squeeze out ever possible detail we could about the upcoming Avengers film, the identity of Loki’s then-unconfirmed army (referred to in promotional materials as simply “REDACTED”) was one of the biggest sources of fan theorizing.  A very common guess were the Skrull, a well-established alien race in the Marvel comics, who were just coming off of a pretty big popularity boost thanks to 2008’s “Secret Invasion” cross over.  When the identity of the army was revealed as the Chitauri, the Ultimate Universe’s equivalent to the Skrull, it was confirmed that they were chosen due to the Skrull being tied up in the Fantastic Four licensing, and that the MCU wouldn’t be seeing their own Skrull Empire any time soon.  What a difference seven years makes.  Now, we’re not only getting our first taste of the MCU Skrull in Captain Marvel, but also getting toy coverage, courtesy of the film’s villain Talos, who I’m looking at today!

THE FIGURE ITSELF

Talos is numbered figure 2 in the Kree Sentry Series of Marvel Legends, and is yet another Captain Marvel film-based figure for the assortment.  The figure stands 6 1/2 inches tall and has 30 points of articulation.  Talos is kind of the antithesis of the Nick Fury figure from yesterday in that, while he looks all-new at first glance, there’s actually a sizable chunk of re-use going on.  His torso, pelvis, and legs are all re-used from the Ragnarok version of Loki.  While the two designs aren’t exactly matches for each other in the films, the use of a new overlay piece on the torso, plus a new head and arms means that the only exposed similarities between the two are the legs, and they’re honestly close enough to the movie design that it works out okay.  The new pieces are pretty nicely rendered, with the head really being the star piece of work.  It seems like it’s a pretty solid match for Ben Mendelsohn’s Talos make-up, and the details are nice and sharp.  The jacket overlay piece is a little on the bulky side, but it’s far from the worst we’ve seen at this scale, and is nowhere near a limiting as similar pieces have proved.  It’s also removable, should you want to mix up his look, or possibly have a few non-Talos Skrull soldiers.  The paintwork on Talos isn’t anything super involved, but it’s still pretty nice looking.  The subtle purple lining the uniform works quite well, and there’s a nice lifelike quality to the way the face has been handled.  Talos includes no specific accessories of his own, but does still have the leg of the Kree Sentry BaF.  It’s a shame we couldn’t get anything character-specific, especially given the re-use on this particular figure.

THE ME HALF OF THE EQUATION

The Skrull have a very distinctive design, but it’s one I’d yet to get as a Legends figure, so when this guy first surfaced, I was certainly intrigued.  Talos presents a nice update to the classic look, and the figure represents a decent repurposing of parts, and is another nice and unique figure for this assortment.

Like the last two figures, Talos was purchased from my friends at All Time Toys, and he’s still available here.  And, if you’re looking for other toys both old and new, please check out their website and their eBay storefront.